40 Stunning Native Oregon Flowers & Wildflowers

Oregon boasts a beautiful range of native flowers and wildflowers. The Beaver State also provides varied habitats for plants, meaning there’s always something to see and enjoy throughout the year. This article will explore 40 stunning Oregon native flowers and wildflowers.

Stunning Native Oregon Flowers & Wildflowers

Oregon Native Range and Growing Zones

Oregon is located in the Pacific Northwest and provides a varied range of ecosystems. Oregon’s diverse climate occupies USDA Growing Zones 4b to 9b. Oregon’s coast occupies warmer zones, while the state’s eastern half experiences colder conditions.

Mountainous areas dominate Western Oregon, especially around Mount Hood. Meanwhile, the Columbia River provides wetland habitats and fertile soils for various plants. The Oregon high desert in the southeast offers the ideal habitat for desert wildflowers and scrub plants.

How are Oregon’s Native Flowers Defined?

Oregon’s native plants are broadly defined as plants that grew in the area without human interference. Oregon’s native plants already occupied the area long before Europeans arrived in the 16th Century. This differs from naturalized plants introduced to Oregon’s ecosystems from elsewhere.

40 Types of Native Oregon Flowers


1) Cascade Azalea

Cascade Azalea are beautiful native Oregon flowers

Also known as white rhododendron, cascade azalea is a deciduous shrub from the heather family (Ericaceae). This species produces clusters of white, bell-shaped flowers during late summer. The flowers are borne on upright stems with crinkled leaves.

Cascade azalea thrives in Oregon’s conifer forests in the northwestern part of the state. These shrubs grow best in moist, acidic soils in partial shade.

Scientific Name:Rhododendron albiflorum
Growing Zones:7 to 9
Flowering Season:Summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:3 to 8 feet

2) Chocolate Lily

Chocolate Lily growing natively in Oregon

Also known as mission bells or checker lily, chocolate lily belongs to the lily family (Liliaceae). Chocolate lilies are native Oregon flowers that thrive in wildflower meadows and open woodlands throughout the Pacific Northwest.

Chocolate lilies produce nodding dark brown flowers with six petals. The inner surface of the petals displays a checkered pattern. These perennials grow from bulbs and produce whorls of lance-shaped leaves.

Scientific Name:Fritillaria affinis
Growing Zones:5 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:4 inches to 4 feet

3) Common Camas

Common Camas growing natively in Oregon

Common camas is a grass-like herbaceous perennial from the asparagus family (Asparagaceae). These plants produce racemes of beautiful blue flowers from late spring to early summer. Each flower has six tepals with golden yellow stamens.

Common camas thrive in prairies, marshes, and other grassland habitats. Common camas once occupied large “camas prairies”, where Native American societies used to consume the bulbs.

Scientific Name:Camassia quamash
Growing Zones:4 to 11
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:1 to 2 feet

4) Diamond Clarkia

Diamond Clarkia growing natively in Oregon

Also known as common clarkia or forest clarkia, diamond clarkia belongs to the evening primrose family (Onagraceae). Diamond clarkia is found throughout most of Oregon and thrives in woodlands and pine forests.

Diamond clarkia produces thin, spindly stems with small leaves and pink or purple flowers. Each flower has four diamond-shaped petals displaying darker speckles. The flowers have several stamens producing distinctive blue-gray pollen.

Scientific Name:Clarkia rhomboidea
Growing Zones:5 to 9
Flowering Season:Summer
Light Requirements:Full sun
Mature Height:8 inches to 2 feet

5) Douglas Aster

Douglas Aster growing natively in Oregon

Douglas asters come from the aster or daisy family (Asteraceae). These herbaceous perennials have violet daisy-like flowers with thin petals and yellow or red central florets. The toothed leaves are covered in fine hairs.

Douglas asters are found throughout the western half of Oregon. These wildflowers thrive in moist, open areas in Zones 5 to 9, including along coastlines and streams.

Scientific Name:Symphyotrichum subspicatum
Growing Zones:5 to 9
Flowering Season:Summer to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun or partial shade
Mature Height:1 to 4 feet

6) Bicolor Lupine

Bicolor Lupine growing natively in Oregon

Also known as miniature lupine, bicolor lupine is an annual flowering herb from the pea family (Fabaceae). Bicolor lupine thrives in nutrient-poor soils across Western Oregon and improves nitrogen levels for other plants.

Bicolor lupine produces short spikes of pea-like, two-tone dark blue and white flowers. The flowers are grouped into tight racemes and bloom from early spring to early summer.

Scientific Name:Lupinus bicolor
Growing Zones:8 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun
Mature Height:4 inches to 2 feet

7) Fairy Slipper Orchid

Fairy Slipper Orchid growing natively in Oregon

Also known as calypso orchids or Venus’s slipper, fairy slipper orchids are the only species in the Calypso genus. These orchids thrive in damp, sheltered woodlands throughout western and northeastern Oregon.

Fairy slipper orchids produce a single leaf in the fall and a solitary flower in the spring. The flowers have purplish-pink petals and a purple and white slipper pouch with yellow markings.

Scientific Name:Calypso bulbosa
Growing Zones:6 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Partial to full shade
Mature Height:2 to 8 inches

8) Hooker’s Fairy Bells

Hooker's Fairy Bells growing natively in Oregon

Hooker’s fairy bells are elegant herbaceous perennials from the lily family. These native Oregon flowers are also known as drops-of-gold. Hooker’s fairy bells grow in shaded woodland habitats across western and northeastern Oregon.

Hooker’s fairy bells bloom from March until July. Each hairy stem produces up to three bell-shaped nodding white or greenish-white flowers. The flowers each have six petals and six stamens.

Scientific Name:Prosartes hookeri
Growing Zones:7 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Partial to full shade
Mature Height:1 to 3 feet

9) Indian Paintbrush

Indian Paintbrush flowers in bloom

Indian paintbrushes are herbaceous flowering plants in the Castilleja genus of the broomrape family (Orobanchaceae). Oregon is home to approximately 17 species of Indian paintbrush. Indian paintbrushes are hemiparasitic plants that get some of their nutrients from surrounding plants.

Indian paintbrushes produce upright stems topped with dense clusters of brush-like flowers. These flowers are edible and were eaten by Native American societies.

Scientific Name:Castilleja spp.
Growing Zones:3 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun
Mature Height:1 to 2 feet

10) Lewis’s Mock Orange

White Lewis's Mock Orange flowers in bloom

Lewis’s mock orange is a deciduous shrub from the hydrangea family (Hydrangeaceae) found throughout Oregon. This type of mock orange thrives in conifer forests and moist woodlands. It is named after the famous explorer Meriwether Lewis.

Lewis’s mock orange produces masses of fragrant white flowers. The smell is similar to orange blossom. Each flower has four petals and a cluster of yellow stamens.

Scientific Name:Philadelphus lewisii
Growing Zones:4 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:5 to 10 feet

11) Mountain Bluebells

Mountain Bluebells growing natively in Oregon

Mountain bluebells are a beautiful member of the borage family (Boraginaceae). These native Oregon flowers have upright stems with hanging clusters of dark blue bell-shaped flowers. The flowers turn pinkish-red as they age.

Mountain bluebells are found throughout the eastern and southern parts of Oregon. These plants thrive in mountain meadows and moist wetland habitats such as bogs. They flower during the summer.

Scientific Name:Mertensia ciliata
Growing Zones:3 to 7
Flowering Season:Summer
Light Requirements:Full sun or partial shade
Mature Height:1 to 4 feet

12) Nootka Rose

Pink Nootka Rose

Nootka roses grow in coastal areas and meadows in western Oregon. These attractive members of the rose family (Rosaceae) also grow in northeastern regions. Nootka roses prefer shaded areas.

Nootka roses grow as dense thickets of light green leaves and prickly branches. Nootka roses produce single pink flowers from late spring to mid-summer, followed by bright red rose hips.

Scientific Name:Rosa nutkana
Growing Zones:5 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun or partial shade
Mature Height:5 to 6 feet

13) Northern Bog Violet

Northern Bog Violet growing natively in Oregon

Northern bog violets are colorful herbaceous annuals from the Violaceae family. As their name suggests, these native Oregon flowers thrive in bogs and other wetland habitats. Woodland bogs that provide shade and cool temperatures are ideal.

Northern bog violets have purple flowers with cream or white centers. These plants are also known as kidney-leaved violets, thanks to the shape of their leaves.

Scientific Name:Viola nephrophylla
Growing Zones:3 to 8
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to full shade
Mature Height:5 to 10 inches

14) Oregon Checker-Mallow

Oregon Checker-Mallow growing natively in Oregon

Oregon checker-mallow is a small perennial shrub from the mallow family (Malvaceae). These attractive plants are found throughout most of Oregon. Oregon checker-mallow thrives in meadows, shrublands, and pine forests.

Oregon checker-mallow produces tall flower spikes covered in pink flowers with white centers in late spring and early summer. Each flower has five petals and a central cluster of small stamens.

Scientific Name:Sidalcea oregana
Growing Zones:5 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:2 to 5 feet

15) Oregon Geranium

Oregon Geranium growing natively in Oregon

Also known as Oregon cranesbill, Oregon geranium is a herbaceous perennial from the Geraniaceae family. Oregon geranium grows in western parts of the state. It grows best in shaded meadows and woodlands or open prairies.

Oregon geranium flowers from late spring until mid-summer. Oregon geranium produces slender stems which bear pinkish-purple flowers with five petals. Each plant has a clump of palmate leaves.

Scientific Name:Geranium oreganum
Growing Zones:5 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:15 to 30 inches

16) Oregon Iris

Oregon Iris growing natively in Oregon

Also known as toughleaf iris, Oregon iris is a perennial plant from the Iridaceae family. Its common name comes from the tough, stringy leaves which can be used to make rope. Oregon iris produces showy blue or purple flowers with yellow markings.

Oregon iris grows in woodlands and along roadsides in western Oregon. These irises also grow in Union County in northeastern Oregon.

Scientific Name:Iris tenax
Growing Zones:5 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:6 to 12 inches

17) Oregon Saxifrage

Oregon Saxifrage growing natively in Oregon

Oregon saxifrage is a long-flowering herbaceous perennial from the saxifrage family (Saxifragaceae). Oregon saxifrage thrives in bogs and other wetland habitats throughout Oregon. These plants can grow between 1 and 3 feet tall.

Oregon saxifrage produces clusters or peduncles of tiny white flowers on tall leafless stems. The leaves form a rosette on the ground and have toothed edges. Oregon saxifrage blooms throughout spring and summer.

Scientific Name:Saxifraga oregana
Growing Zones:5 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring and summer
Light Requirements:Partial shade
Mature Height:1 to 3 feet

18) Oregon Stonecrop

Oregon Stonecrop growing natively in Oregon

Oregon stonecrop is a low-growing perennial succulent from the stonecrop family (Crassulaceae). These attractive, hardy plants form sprawling mats of succulent leaves and clusters of small yellow flowers. The leaves grow as small rosettes on short stems.

Oregon stonecrop thrives in dry, rocky areas and alpine slopes across western Oregon. It also grows in coastal areas and cliffs. Like most succulents, Oregon stonecrop requires full sun.

Scientific Name:Sedum oreganum
Growing Zones:5 to 9
Flowering Season:Summer
Light Requirements:Full sun
Mature Height:3 to 6 inches

19) Oregon Sunshine

Oregon Sunshine growing natively in Oregon

Oregon sunshine is a herbaceous perennial subshrub from the sunflower family (Asteraceae). It’s also called the common wooly sunflower due to its dense mass of stems. The stems and silvery foliage are covered in wooly hairs.

Oregon sunshine produces a mass of bright yellow flowers with yellow central florets. Oregon sunshine grows throughout the state in dry, rocky areas such as prairies and coastlines.

Scientific Name:Eriophyllum lanatum
Growing Zones:5 to 8
Flowering Season:Spring and summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:1 to 2 feet

20) Pacific Bleeding Heart

Pacific Bleeding Heart growing natively in Oregon

Pacific bleeding heart is an attractive herbaceous perennial from the poppy family (Papaveraceae). These native Oregon flowers grow as a dense clump of fern-like leaves. The nodding pink heart-shaped flowers emerge on succulent, leafless stems during spring and summer.

Pacific bleeding heart grows in western parts of Oregon along the Pacific coast. It thrives in moist, shady areas such as woodlands. In cooler areas, it can tolerate full sun.

Scientific Name:Dicentra formosa
Growing Zones:3 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:1 to 2 feet

21) Pacific Dogwood

Pacific Dogwood growing natively in Oregon

Also known as Western dogwood, Pacific dogwood is a deciduous tree from the Cornaceae family. It thrives in shady woodlands in western Oregon. Like all dogwoods, the reddish-brown bark provides seasonal interest during the winter.

Pacific dogwood trees bloom from late spring to early summer. The flowers consist of several white or pinkish bracts surrounding a central cluster of tiny green flowers.

Scientific Name:Cornus nuttallii
Growing Zones:7 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:15 to 40 feet

22) Pacific Yew

Pacific Yew growing natively in Oregon

Pacific yew trees are native to the Pacific Northwest and are classed as Near Threatened. These evergreen conifers are slow-growing trees. Pacific yew trees grow in moist forests and woodlands in western Oregon.

Pacific yew trees have needle-like leaves and scaly bark. Each tree has male and female flower cones. The male flowers are small and yellow and release their pollen during the spring.

Scientific Name:Taxus brevifolia
Growing Zones:4 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring
Light Requirements:Full sun to full shade
Mature Height:15 to 50 feet

23) Purple Sanicle

Purple Sanicle in bloom

Also known as purple black-snakeroot, purple sanicle is a herbaceous perennial from the parsley family (Apiaceae). Purple sanicle produces globe-shaped clusters of tiny purple or red flowers. The color of the stems ranges from light green to dark purple.

These native Oregon flowers grow in grasslands and prairies or open woodlands across western Oregon. These unusual plants favor rocky areas and low elevations.

Scientific Name:Sanicula bipinnatifida
Growing Zones:6 to 8
Flowering Season:Spring
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:1 to 3 feet

24) Red-Flowering Currant

Red-Flowering Currant in bloom

Red-flowering currant is a deciduous perennial shrub from the gooseberry family (Grossulariaceae). It grows best in open woodlands and rocky slopes across western Oregon. Although the dark purple fruits are edible, they taste underwhelming.

Red-flowering currant produces several upright stems with alternate palm-shaped leaves. As the stems begin to arch in the spring, clusters of hanging reddish-pink or white flowers emerge.

Scientific Name:Ribes sanguineum
Growing Zones:6 to 8
Flowering Season:Spring
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:5 to 12 feet

25) Redwood Violet

Yellow Redwood Violet

Also known as evergreen violet, redwood violet is an attractive member of the Violaceae family. Redwood violet produces bright yellow flowers with dark purple veins in spring and early summer. These plants spread using underground runners.

Redwood violets inhabit forests and woodlands in western Oregon. These low-growing perennial flowers act as ground cover and rarely grow above 6 inches.

Scientific Name:Viola sempervirens
Growing Zones:6 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Partial to full shade
Mature Height:2 to 6 inches

26) Showy Milkweed

Showy Milkweed growing natively in Oregon

Showy milkweed is a dramatic perennial from the dogbane family (Apocynaceae). Showy milkweed grows in open grasslands and along roadsides across much of Oregon. It’s a vital food plant for monarch butterfly larvae.

Showy milkweed produces hairy, upright stems topped with clusters of pink, star-shaped flowers. The leaves are simple and elongated. Showy milkweed produces a milky sap when cut, which can cause skin irritation.

Scientific Name:Asclepias speciosa
Growing Zones:3 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun
Mature Height:2 to 4 feet

27) Silver Lupine

Silver Lupine growing natively in Oregon

Also known as whiteleaf lupine, silver lupine is a perennial shrub from the pea family (Fabaceae). It’s native to California and Oregon, which is the northernmost part of its range. Silver lupine grows in open meadows and rocky valleys in western Oregon.

Silver lupine produces upright stalks bearing light blue or purple pea-like flowers. It also has feathery silver leaves, hence its common name.

Scientific Name:Lupinus albifrons
Growing Zones:6 to 10
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun
Mature Height:3 to 5 feet

28) Sitka Valerian

Sitka Valerian growing natively in Oregon

Sitka valerian is a herbaceous perennial from the honeysuckle family (Caprifoliaceae). It grows in moist meadows and woodlands in western and northeastern Oregon. Native Americans used Sitka valerian roots as a food source.

Sitka valerian has upright stems topped with clusters of white or pink flowers. The leaves can be deeply lobed or toothed and are often covered in fine hairs. Sitka valerian spreads via underground rhizomes.

Scientific Name:Valeriana sitchensis
Growing Zones:3 to 8
Flowering Season:Summer
Light Requirements:Partial shade
Mature Height:1 to 2 feet

29) Small-Flowered Alumroot

Small-Flowered Alumroot growing natively in Oregon

Also known as crevice alumroot, small-flowered alumroot is a herbaceous perennial from the saxifrage family (Saxifragaceae). It produces clumps of hairy, reddish-purple scallop-shaped leaves. Flower stalks emerge in late spring and early summer, bearing clusters of delicate, tiny pink, white, or red flowers.

Small-flowered alumroot has lobed, hairy leaves. It thrives on cliffs and rocky slopes throughout western and northeastern Oregon.

Scientific Name:Heuchera micrantha
Growing Zones:4 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to full shade
Mature Height:1 to 2 feet

30) Smooth Yellow Violet

Smooth Yellow Violet in bloom

Smooth yellow violet is a beautiful member of the Violaceae family native to Oregon. These low-growing herbaceous perennials thrive in moist, shaded woodlands and along riverbanks. Smooth yellow violets are distributed across western and northeastern Oregon.

Smooth yellow violets are deciduous plants that form clumps of heart-shaped leaves. Each flower stem produces a single bright yellow flower with dark purple veins.

Scientific Name:Viola glabella
Growing Zones:5 to 8
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Partial shade
Mature Height:4 to 8 inches

31) Spreading Phlox

Spreading Phlox growing natively in Oregon

Spreading phlox is a low-growing herbaceous perennial from the phlox family (Polemoniaceae). These charming plants form beautiful mats on dry or rocky hillsides across most of Oregon.

Spreading phlox has simple bright green lance-shaped or needle-like foliage. The flowers bloom directly on top, creating a mass of pink, purple, or white flowers. Each flower has five rounded petals and bright yellow anthers.

Scientific Name:Phlox diffusa
Growing Zones:4 to 8
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun
Mature Height:3 to 4 inches

32) Streambank Lupine

Streambank Lupine growing natively in Oregon

Riverbank or streambank lupine is a herbaceous perennial from the legume or pea family. It produces tall stems bearing narrow leaves and spikes of blue or purple flowers. The blooms last for several weeks throughout spring and summer.

Streambank lupine grows in sandy or rocky soils near wetland areas such as streams and riverbanks. Streambank lupine is distributed throughout western Oregon.

Scientific Name:Lupinus rivularis
Growing Zones:7 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun
Mature Height:1 to 5 feet

33) Streambank Springbeauty

Streambank Springbeauty growing natively in Oregon

Also known as miner’s lettuce, streambank springbeauty is a herbaceous annual from the Montiaceae family. It is a common wildflower found throughout Oregon. Streambank springbeauty grows best in shady, moist areas along riverbanks or streams.

Streambank springbeauty produces round green leaves on slender stems. Up to 40 tiny white or pink flowers emerge above the leaves from February through until May.

Scientific Name:Claytonia parviflora
Growing Zones:6 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring
Light Requirements:Partial to full shade
Mature Height:2 to 12 inches

34) Tall Oregon Grape

Tall Oregon Grape growing natively in Oregon

Oregon grape is a flowering evergreen shrub from the barberry family (Berberidaceae). It has been Oregon’s official state flower since 1899. It thrives in oak forests, woodlands, and sagebrush slopes throughout western Oregon.

These native Oregon flowers have spiky, leathery leaves and dense clusters of bright yellow flowers. Each flower has six petals and six sepals. Oregon grape produces dark blue grape-like berries in late summer and fall.

Scientific Name:Mahonia aquifolium
Growing Zones:5 to 8
Flowering Season:Spring
Light Requirements:Partial to full shade
Mature Height:3 to 6 feet

35) Western Azalea

Western Azalea are beautiful native Oregon flowers

Western azalea is a deciduous shrub from the heather family (Ericaceae). It’s one of only two Rhododendron species indigenous to western North America. Southwestern Oregon’s coniferous forests represent the northernmost extent of its range.

Western azalea produces beautiful clusters of fragrant white, pink, and purple flowers with yellow patches. It thrives in wetland habitats and grows best in acidic soils.

Scientific Name:Rhododendron occidentale
Growing Zones:7 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:6 to 15 feet

36) Western Columbine

Western Columbine growing natively in Oregon

Western columbine is a striking herbaceous perennial from the buttercup family (Ranunculaceae). During spring and summer, Western columbine produces large, nodding red flowers with distinctive spurs. A long cluster of yellow stamens hangs down from the center of the flower.

Western columbine grows throughout most of Oregon. It grows best in moist, open habitats such as meadows and woodlands.

Scientific Name:Aquilegia formosa
Growing Zones:3 to 8
Flowering Season:Spring and summer
Light Requirements:Full sun or partial shade
Mature Height:1 to 2 feet

37) Western Trillium

Western Trillium are beautiful native Oregon flowers

Also known as Pacific trillium, western trillium is a herbaceous perennial from the bunchflower family (Melanthiaceae). These native Oregon flowers thrive in cool, moist woodlands and forests throughout west and northeastern Oregon.

Western trillium grows as a clump of simple rounded leaves with tapered tips. In late winter and spring, white flowers with three petals emerge. There are three green sepals underneath the petals.

Scientific Name:Trillium ovatum
Growing Zones:5 to 8
Flowering Season:Late winter to spring
Light Requirements:Partial to full shade
Mature Height:1 to 2 feet

38) Western Yellow Woodsorrel

Western Yellow Woodsorrel growing natively in Oregon

Western yellow woodsorrel is a herbaceous perennial from the wood sorrel family (Oxalidaceae). It’s native to the Pacific Northwest and grows in open woodlands throughout western Oregon.

Western yellow woodsorrel grows as a clump of light green leaves, each with three heart-shaped leaflets. Single bright yellow flowers emerge in spring and summer. The flowers have five slender petals.

Scientific Name:Oxalis suksdorfii
Growing Zones:5 to 11
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:4 to 12 inches

39) White Bog Orchid

White Bog Orchid growing natively in Oregon

Also known as bog candles, white bog orchids are attractive orchids native to western parts of North America. White bog orchids grow in bogs and other wetland habitats across most of Oregon. It can also be found along roadsides.

White bog orchids are upright perennials that produce spikes of white, fragrant flowers. The flowers have a potent spicy fragrance.

Scientific Name:Platanthera dilatata
Growing Zones:4 to 9
Flowering Season:Summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:1 to 4 feet

40) Yellow Monkeyflower

Yellow Monkeyflower are beautiful native oregon flowers

Yellow monkeyflowers are annual or perennial herbaceous plants from the lopseed family (Phrymaceae). Yellow monkeyflowers produce bright yellow tubular blooms with red spots around the neck. These plants also produce round or oval hairy leaves.

Yellow monkeyflowers grow throughout Oregon and the Pacific Northwest. They thrive in moist habitats and wetland areas such as bogs, swamps, and woodlands.

Scientific Name:Mimulus guttatus
Growing Zones:6 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:1 to 3 feet

Oregon Native Flowers FAQs

What is Oregon’s State Flower?

Oregon’s official state flower is the Oregon grape (Mahonia aquifolium). This evergreen shrub was designated as the state flower in 1899.

What Flowers is Oregon Known For?

Oregon is known for its state flower, Oregon grape. The Beaver State is also known for native wildflowers such as Indian paintbrush, red-flowering currant, and Western trillium.

Can You Pick Wildflowers in Oregon?

It’s illegal to pick any of Oregon’s wildflowers on public land. This includes National parks, state parks, and highways or roadsides. It’s also illegal to pick flowers on private land unless you have permission from the landowner.

Where Can I Find Native Flowers in Oregon?

Oregon’s native flowers are found in various ecosystems throughout the state. Wildflowers are generally more common in open areas and along roadsides during the growing season.

Native Oregon Flowers: Wrapping Up

Oregon enjoys a charismatic lineup of native wildflowers and flowering plants. These plants occupy a diverse range of habitats throughout the state. Oregon is best known for the Oregon grape, its official state flower. Other beautiful native wildflowers include Oregon checker-mallow, diamond clarkia, and Western trillium. Remember that it’s illegal to pick native flowers unless you’re on private land and have the landowner’s permission.

Contributing Editor | edd@petalrepublic.com | Full Bio

Edd is a budding content writer and gardener living in the United Kingdom. He has a bachelor's degree in Creative and Professional Writing and has written for several gardening publications online. He is passionate about nature and sustainability with a focus on gardening and wildlife.

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