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Beautiful Anemone Varieties to Grow in Your Garden 

The delicate beauty and vibrant colors of anemone flowers grow naturally all around the world. With even more stunning cultivars and hybrids widely available, they are also a popular choice for gardeners. So, we invite you to join anemone lovers everywhere and add some of the following popular types of anemone flowers to your garden this growing season.


About Anemone Flowers

About Anemone Flowers

Anemone is a genus containing 63 accepted species of herbaceous, flowering perennials and belonging to the Ranunculaceae (buttercup) plant family. They are commonly called windflowers and have a broad native range, with plants growing naturally on all continents except Antarctica and Australia.

Botanical Characteristics

Anemones have slender stems and long-stemmed basal leaves. They produce cymes of 2 to 9 singular flowers with an alluringly delicate look. They produce sepal-like bracts in vibrant shades of red, pink, purple, blue, and yellow and have striking, eye-like centers filled with prominent stamens.

Varieties and Flowering Seasons

Anemone species are split into three main horticultural groups:

  • Anemones with tuberous root systems that are native to alpine and woodland meadows and bloom in spring
  • Anemones with tuberous root systems that are native to hot, arid climates and bloom in spring and summer
  • Anemones with non-tuberous, fibrous root systems that are native to moist and shady climates and bloom in late summer and autumn

For more, see our in-depth guide to the Anemone flowering season.

Uses and Benefits

Uses and Benefits

Several species and varieties of anemones are salt-tolerant, making them a good option for the often challenging, salty soils of coastal garden areas.

Additionally, anemones contain several chemical compounds that offer potential health benefits, such as anti-inflammatories, immunomodulators, antioxidants, and antimicrobials. Further, some compounds have demonstrated anti-cancer activities.

Anemones in Culture

Anemones also have a prominent place in cultures around the world. They are widely noted in western cultures for their origin story rooted in Greek mythology, where it is said that anemones sprung up from Aphrodite’s tears shed upon the blood of her murdered lover, Adonis.

In both Egyptian and Chinese cultures, anemones are regarded as a symbol of illness, and in Japan, they are associated with bad luck and ill tidings. Conversely, during the Middle Ages, European peasants carried anemones to protect them from pests, diseases, and bad luck.

In the Victorian language of flowers, anemones symbolize forsaken love.



1. Anemone ‘Wild Swan’

Anemone 'Wild Swan'

About:

The Anemone ‘Wild Swan’ is a relatively new anemone variety, but its beautifully large flowers and long blooming season made it gain popularity quickly. This anemone is a hybrid between two species, Anemone hupehensis, and Anemone rupicola. This particular pairing is responsible for the variety’s exceptionally long blooming season, as it combines both a spring-blooming species and a late-fall-blooming species. During the day, blossoms open up to about 3 to 4 inches across and close into nodding bells in the late evening. Be sure to water these anemones regularly.

Scientific Name:Anemone ‘Wild Swan’
Flowering Season:Spring through fall
USDA Growing Zones:4 to 8
Colors:White petals, lavender bracts, and yellow centers

2. Anemone ‘Hadspen Abundance’

Anemone 'Hadspen Abundance'

About:

This variety of Japanese anemones is one of the most popular, and it’s an award-winner thanks to its striking and unusual arrangement of petals. The magenta flowers are 2 to 3 inches across with two smaller, more vibrantly colored petals and three larger, paler petals. This arrangement gives the petals an oblong, funky shape that can add real personality to a garden. They’re a great addition to any garden in need of late-season color since these begin blooming in late spring and continue until the first frost.

Scientific Name:Anemone hupehensis ‘Hadspen Abundance’
Flowering Season:Late summer through fall
USDA Growing Zones:4 to 8
Colors:White-tipped magenta petals and yellow centers

3. Anemone ‘Queen Charlotte’

Anemone 'Queen Charlotte'

About: 

The Anemone ‘Queen Charlotte’ is a striking hybrid. This variety has rich-green basal foliage and produces large, bowl-shaped, semi-double blooms that have poms of slender, ruffled petals in pink shades that range from rose to cotton candy, deepening toward the flowers’ bright-yellow centers. Remaining in bloom through fall, these flowers provide a great source of nutrition for pollinators late in the growing season.

Scientific Name:Anemone x hybrida ‘Queen Charlotte’
Flowering Season:Early summer to late fall
USDA Growing Zones:5 to 8
Colors:Cotton candy pink with yellow centers

4. Anemone ‘September Charm’

Anemone 'September Charm'

About: 

Another award-winning Japanese anemone, the Anemone ‘Silver Charm’ grows to be about 3 to 4 feet tall and 2 to 3 feet across, producing large masses of charming flowers with slightly variegated petals that feature a blend of blushing pink and silvery white around bright-yellow centers. The backs of the petals and closed buds feature a deeper, rosy shade of pink. The stems are slender and reddish-brown, allowing the windflower blossoms to sway cheerfully in the breeze.

Scientific Name:Anemone x hybrida ‘September Charm’
Flowering Season:Late summer through fall
USDA Growing Zones:4 to 8
Colors:Silvery white to blush pink flowers with yellow centers

5. Tenpetal Anemone

Tenpetal Anemone

About: 

The tenpetal anemone is a native wildflower that grows across much of the southern United States from Florida to Texas, as far north as Kansas, and as far south as northern Mexico. This species of anemone can grow to be 20 inches tall, but it is often much shorter and compact, with its skinny-petaled star-shaped flower blossoms opening up just a few inches about the ground in the meadows, prairies and hillsides where it thrives. The flowers of this anemone are ringed with ten petals, rather than the more typical five petals of single-blossom anemone flowers.

Scientific Name:Anemone berlandieri
Flowering Season:Late winter through spring
USDA Growing Zones:7 to 9
Colors:Greenish white or purplish blue

6. Anemone ‘Splendens’

Anemone 'Splendens'

About: 

This anemone cultivar is another garden favorite. It produces big groups of cup-shaped flowers in deep shades of pink with golden-colored bowl-shaped central stamens. The Anemone ‘Splendens’ also has a long blooming season, producing flowers for several weeks starting in late summer and continuing until the late fall or first frost. These anemones are easy to grow and will spread naturally in your garden, making them an excellent choice for cottage or informal gardens.

Scientific Name:Anemone hupehensis var Japonica ‘Splendens’
Flowering Season:Late summer through fall
USDA Growing Zones:5 to 8
Colors:Deep pink petals with golden-orange centers

7. Japanese Anemone ‘Montrose’

Japanese Anemone 'Montrose'

About: 

This hybrid anemone features upright, saucer-shaped blossoms that face the sky. The semi-double to full-double blossoms open up in shades of deep rosy pink that borders on magenta and feature cheerful greenish-yellow centers ringed with a puff of fuzzy, golden stamens. With their tuberous root systems, these anemones are self-spreading and will fill out their garden space with brilliant color in a matter of years.

Scientific Name:Anemone x hybrida ‘Montrose’
Flowering Season:Late summer through fall
USDA Growing Zones:6 to 9
Colors:Light pink

8. Canada Anemone

Canada Anemone

About: 

This species of anemone is native to a large portion of North America, particularly Canada, hence one of its common names, the Canada anemone. This anemone features modest blossoms that are delicate and attractive, with petal-like sepals that open up in a snowy shade of white with golden-yellow stamens at their centers. The flowers are about 2 inches in diameter and have three large petals in addition to two smaller petals, giving the blossoms oblong rather than circular shapes. Historically, these flowers were used topically to treat wounds and sores by the indigenous peoples of the flower’s native region.

Scientific Name:Anemone canadensis
Flowering Season:Spring
USDA Growing Zones:3 to 8
Colors:White petals with yellow centers

9. De Caen Anemones

De Caen Anemones

About: 

This variety of anemones actually refers to a group of anemones called De Caen anemones. This group’s perennial flowers feature velvety semi-double blossoms that flutter in the wind and have a strong resemblance to the flowers of poppies. The blossoms of this group can be either blue, red, white, or violet. The white flowers feature centers in a milky shade of greenish-white, while the other colors have dark centers, almost-black shades of blue, red, or violet. These anemones are perfect for creating a carpet of color in a flower bed or for growing in a cutting garden to create stunning bouquets.

Scientific Name:Anemone coronaria ‘De Caen’
Flowering Season:Late spring
USDA Growing Zones:3 to 10
Colors:blue, red, and violet with almost black centers or white with greenish-white centers

10. Broad-Leaved Anemone

Broad-Leaved Anemone

About: 

Anemone hortensis is a windflower species native to the Mediterranean Basin. It’s commonly referred to as the broad-leaved anemone, which is likely in reference to the hand-shaped lobes of its basal leaves. While the foliage is attractive on its own, the flowers produced by this species are uniquely beautiful due to their unusual blue features, which are rare in naturally occurring flowers. Certain varieties have bluish-white petals, and all feature vibrantly deep blue colors in their centers and/or stamens.

Scientific Name:Anemone hortensis
Flowering Season:Spring
USDA Growing Zones:6 to 9
Colors:mauve, reddish-purple, and bluish-white with deep-blue or violet stamens

11. Anemone ‘Pocahontas’

Anemone 'Pocahontas'

About: 

This double-blossomed variety of Japanese anemones features flowers in a sweet shade of bubblegum-pink with ruffled petals that curve to create saucer-shaped, upright blossoms. The frilled petals surround a vibrant green center that is surrounded by a ring of warm-golden stamens. While these anemones will still wobble in the breeze, they are supported by reasonably sturdy stems, which means they can withstand tougher, windier conditions than other, more delicate varieties. As a result, they do not require a sheltered garden space to thrive.

Scientific Name:Anemone hupehensis ‘Pocahontas’
Flowering Season:Mid-summer to fall
USDA Growing Zones:5 to 8
Colors:Bubblegum-pink petals with green centers and golden stamens

12. Round-Lobed Hepatica

Round-Lobed Hepatica

About: 

Anemone americana is native to the southern United States, particularly the wetter portions of the southeast. This variety of anemones has large, stemless basal leaves that do not form each growing season until after the perennial plant has bloomed. The flowers are produced atop 4 to 8-inch, brownish-colored stalks. The flowers are small, reaching about one inch in diameter at the largest, but they are beautiful, wearing soft shades of light blue, lavender, or white with bright-green centers and stamens.

Scientific Name:Anemone americana or Hepatica nobilis var. obtusa
Flowering Season:Spring
USDA Growing Zones:3 to 8
Colors:Blue, lavender, and white petals with green centers

13. Anemone ‘Whirlwind’

Anemone 'Whirlwind'

About: 

Another award-winning Japanese anemone, this hybrid variety grows to be 3 to 4 feet tall. It’s low-maintenance and easy to care for, which makes its white semi-double blossoms even more attractive. The blossoms are produced in proliferation on delicate, vine-like stems above clumps of lush-green basal foliage. The petals are slightly ruffled and upturned at the tips. The petals surround a bright-green center and a light dusting of golden stamens.

Scientific Name:Anemone x hybrida ‘Whirlwind’
Flowering Season:Late summer to fall
USDA Growing Zones:4 to 8
Colors:White petals with green and yellow centers

14. Mr. Fokker Anemone

Mr. Fokker Anemone

About: 

Mr. Fokker Anemone is a true beauty. Its flower blossoms have a velvety texture and open up in a surprising and uniquely deep shade of bluish-purple, and they produce orange-red fruits that resemble cherry tomatoes. This species of anemone flower will look eye-catching in any garden. This variety of anemones, native to the Mediterranean, is also commonly called a poppy anemone because its broad and fluttery petals and black button center closely resemble the look of a poppy flower.

Scientific Name:Anemone coronaria de Caen ‘Mr. Fokker’
Flowering Season:Spring
USDA Growing Zones:7 to 10
Colors:Bluish-purple leaves with black centers

15. Anemone ‘Königin Charlotte’

Anemone 'Königin Charlotte'

About: 

Anemone x hybrida ‘Königin Charlotte’ is a semi-double Japanese anemone hybrid that produces masses of flowers about 3 inches in diameter. The petals are a light shade of blush pink that fades to whitish-pink at the tips. On each flower, two rows of petals encircle a green button center and a thick ring of short, golden stamens. In closed and open buds, the underside of the flowers features a much-deeper, purplish-rose shade of pink.

Scientific Name:Anemone x hybrida ‘Königin Charlotte’
Flowering Season:Late summer through fall
USDA Growing Zones:5 to 8
Colors:Blush pink petals, golden stamens, and green centers

16. Snowdrop Anemone

Snowdrop Anemone

About: 

Anemone sylvestris is native to the temperate regions of western Europe and Asia, where it grows well in shady deciduous forests and meadows. Commonly called snowdrop anemone, the plant produces simple yet attractive blossoms with five white petals (featuring a wash of rosy pink on their backsides) with green centers and fuzzy, golden stamens. This species spreads quickly and aggressively, making it an attractive ground cover in garden beds and open areas.

Scientific Name:Anemone sylvestris
Flowering Season:Spring and summer
USDA Growing Zones:3 to 8
Colors:White and pink petals, green centers, and golden stamens

17. Balkan Anemone

Balkan Anemone

About: 

Commonly called the Balkan anemone or Grecian windflower, Anemone blanda is native to the Middle East and southeastern Europe. Its scientific name “blanda” means mild or charming in Latin, and it is a fitting name for the flowers of this species which are simple yet attractive. The blossoms are similar to daisies or asters with their rays of slender petals that appear in delicate shades of white, pink, or purple around greenish-yellow centers.

Scientific Name:Anemone blanda
Flowering Season:Spring
USDA Growing Zones:4 to 8
Colors:White, blue, or pink petals, green centers, and yellow stamens

18. Anemone ‘Prinz Heinrich’

Anemone 'Prinz Heinrich'

About: 

The Anemone ‘Prinz Heinrich’ is a semi-double variety of Japanese anemones that produces lovely deep-pink blossoms with about 10 to 15 flower petals each. The blooms open up on top of wiry stems that grow from low clumps of basal foliage where they gracefully sway in the wind. This variety of anemones tends to have a lower profile, making the species a fitting choice for garden borders. Like other anemone varieties, this one is also salt-tolerant, so it can thrive in coastal gardens.

Scientific Name:Anemone hupehensis ‘Prinz Heinrich’
Flowering Season:Late summer through fall
USDA Growing Zones:5 to 8
Colors:Rose-pink petals, yellow centers, and orange stamens

19. Japanese Anemone ‘Honorine Jobert’

Japanese Anemone 'Honorine Jobert'

About: 

Created in Verdun, France, in 1858, this award-winning, semi-double Japanese anemone hybrid has been a long-time favorite of gardeners everywhere. On 3 to 4-foot stems, the anemone ‘Honorine Jobert’ features large, slightly cupped flowers that are about 2 to 3 inches across. The white flower petals surround striking centers with green buttons and golden-yellow stamens.

Scientific Name:Anemone x hybrida ‘Honorine Jobert’
Flowering Season:Late summer through fall
USDA Growing Zones:4 to 8
Colors:White petals with yellow stamens and green centers

20. Poppy Anemone ‘Bordeaux’

Poppy Anemone 'Bordeaux'

About: 

This poppy anemone has a name that conjures up images of the dark-red wine that the Bordeaux region of France is popular for creating, and it’s an apt image. These anemones feature flowers in just that color. In a deep shade of plum, the petals are tinged with dark purple near their bases and surround a purplish-black central button and stamens. Reaching up to a foot in height, the flower blossoms can last for about four weeks, making them a generous addition to any spring garden.

Scientific Name:Anemone coronaria de Caen ‘Bordeaux’
Flowering Season:Spring
USDA Growing Zones:7 to 10
Colors:Dark-plum and purple

21. Anemone ‘Robustissima’

Anemone 'Robustissima'

About: 

Native to northern China, Anemone tomentosa ‘Robustissima’ is a hybrid variety of Japanese anemones, which gives it its long blooming season. This particular hybrid features single blooms with rose-pink petals that fade to white at their tips, small green button centers, and rings of fuzzy golden stamens. These low-maintenance plants spread naturally and can grow between 3 and 4 feet tall, making them a good selection for a garden in need of some height.

Scientific Name:Anemone tomentosa ‘Robustissima’
Flowering Season:Late summer through fall
USDA Growing Zones:4 to 8
Colors:Pink and white petals with yellow and green centers

22. Japanese Anemone ‘Serenade’

Japanese Anemone 'Serenade'

About: 

Another Japanese anemone hybrid, Anemone x hybrida ‘Serenade’, is a lovely choice for cottage and informal gardens and meadow planting thanks to its natural spreading habit and tendency to sway in the breeze. Growing up to 4 feet tall, this plant produces flowers in proliferation on spindly, reddish-brown stalks that spire up above deeply lobed, dark-green foliage. The semi-double flowers are an attractive shade of almost rosy, lavender-pink with slightly white-tinged tips. The petals surround bright-yellow centers.

Scientific Name:Anemone x hybrida ‘Serenade’
Flowering Season:Late summer through fall
USDA Growing Zones:4 to 8
Colors:Lavender-pink petals with yellow centers

23. Blue Windflower

Blue Windflower

About: 

The blue windflower is native to northern California, Oregon, and Washington in the United States, growing in forested areas below 7,000 feet in elevation. These wildflowers produce deeply lobed basal foliage and simple blossoms that feature five to seven long and narrow petals around a center of sparse white stamens. The flowers are most commonly purple or blue but can also be pink, white, red, or bicolored.

Scientific Name:Anemone oregana
Flowering Season:Spring
USDA Growing Zones:6 to 9
Colors:Purple, blue, pink, red, white, or bicolored

24. Candle Anemone

Candle Anemone

About: 

Anemone cylindrica is native to the western United States. This unusual anemone species grows in thick clumps of basal foliage and produces five-petaled flowers with large, button-shaped centers in a greenish-white color. The species gets its common name, candle anemone, from the fruits that appear after the flowers are spent. They are fuzzy, white, and column-shaped like small 1.5-inch long candles.

Scientific Name:Anemone cylindrica
Flowering Season:Summer
USDA Growing Zones:4 to 7
Colors:Greenish white

25. Yellow Wood Anemone

Yellow Wood Anemone

About: 

Native to the forests of Europe and western Asia, Anemone ranunculoides are unusual and unique because it is the only species of anemone flower that naturally blooms in yellow. Bright yellow with golden stamens and about 1 inch across, the yellow wood anemone’s flowers resemble buttercups (of the Ranunculaceae flower family for which this anemone species gets its scientific name).

Scientific Name:Anemone ranunculoides
Flowering Season:Spring
USDA Growing Zones:4 to 8
Colors:Yellow

26. Anemone Hepatica

Anemone Hepatica

About: 

This compact species of anemone grows naturally in the deciduous forests of Japan. The plants produce small clumps of dark-green basal foliage from which fuzzy stems and flowers sprout. The blossoms can be either violet or pink in color and slightly tinged with white. The central stamens erupt in a shade that matches the flower’s petals.

Scientific Name:Anemone hepatica var. japonica
Flowering Season:Spring
USDA Growing Zones:8 to 9
Colors:Bluish-purple or pink with matching stamens and green centers

27. Japanese Anemone ‘Pamina’

Japanese Anemone 'Pamina'

About: 

Anemone hupehensis var. Japonica ‘Pamina’ is a lovely variety of Japanese anemones. It produces large flowers that can open up to be 2 inches across in deep shades of rosy pink. The double blossoms have two rows of petals that form rosette shapes encircling bright and cheerful-looking central stamens in yellow. The long-lasting blooming season means you can enjoy these flowers in your garden starting around August until the end of September.

Scientific Name:Anemone hupehensis var. Japonica ‘Pamina’
Flowering Season:Late summer through fall
USDA Growing Zones:5 to 8
Colors:Rose pink petals and yellow centers

28. Japanese Anemone

Japanese Anemone

About: 

Anemone tomentosa is native to northern China and produces large clumps of basal foliage and pink flowers with yellow centers and petals that are shaded with patches of deeper pink. The plants are beautiful but also quite aggressive, meaning they can spread rapidly and overtake a garden. To prevent them from completely overtaking your garden, they should be planted in containers or otherwise contained beds.

Scientific Name:Anemone tomentosa
Flowering Season:Late summer through fall
USDA Growing Zones:4 to 7
Colors:Pink with yellow centers

29. Italian Anemone ‘Mistral Plus Bianco Centro Nero’

Italian Anemone 'Mistral Plus Bianco Centro Nero'

About: 

This Italian anemone is a cultivar of a poppy anemone species native to the Mediterranean Basin. They feature highly striking, poppy-like blossoms. The full-double flowers have white petals with the slightest hint of blushing pink and black button centers with black stamens. The elegant blooms form about 8 to 12 inches above the ground, where their deep-green basal foliage grows and spreads naturally.

Scientific Name:Anemone coronaria ‘Mistral Plus Bianco Centro Nero’
Flowering Season:Spring
USDA Growing Zones:8 to 10
Colors:White petals with black centers

30. Poppy Anemone ‘Hollandia’

Poppy Anemone 'Hollandia'

About: 

One of the most visually striking types of anemone flowers available, the Poppy Anemone ‘Hollandia’ features bicolored petals in a bright shade of cherry-red striped with pure white at the base, where the petals meet a dark, purplish-black central button and stamens. The flowers are 2 to 3 inches in diameter, and the plants can grow up to 2 feet in height. Their blooming period lasts for about four weeks in the spring.

Scientific Name:Anemone coronaria de Caen ‘Hollandia’
Flowering Season:Spring
USDA Growing Zones:7 to 10
Colors:Red and white bicolor petals with black centers

Anemone Flower FAQs:

How many types of anemone flowers are there?

According to the Royal Botanical Gardens’ database, Kew Plants of the World Online, there are currently 63 accepted species that belong to the Anemone genus.

What type of flower is an anemone?

Anemones are flowering, herbaceous, perennial plants that belong to the Anemone genus within the Anemoneae tribe, the Ranunculoideae subfamily, and the Ranunculaceae (buttercup) plant family.

What colors do anemones come in?

Anemones come in various colors, including shades of white, yellow, red, pink, purple, and blue.

Do anemones come back every year?

Anemones are perennial flowers which means they come back every year. For optimal blooming, anemones benefit from fertilizing in spring and early summer. 

Do anemones spread and multiply naturally?

Anemones spread naturally through the corms of their tuberous and/or rhizomatic root systems in addition to self-seeding habits.

How much sunlight do anemone flowers need? 

Anemones aren’t like other wildflowers that prefer full sun. Since they’re often found growing among taller plants that shade them, Anemones, in general, need partial shade instead. Full shade will cause them to fail to bloom, but the full sun also scorches most varieties and will slow their growth.

What’s the best soil mix for anemones? 

Anemone flowers grow best in well-draining soil with good aeration and moderate water holding capacity. The pH should be between 6.0 and 7.0. While loam soil is ideal, anemones can also thrive in other soil types.

Can you grow anemones in pots?

Anemones can be grown in pots. When planting anemones in pots, it is generally best to leave about 9 inches between each corm. When grown in pots, however, anemones might not survive the winter, depending on the growing zone, and need to be replanted every year.


Wow With Windflowers in Your Garden

Whether you call them windflowers or anemones, these beauties add vibrant pops of color to your garden and visual interest as their delicate stems gently sway in the breeze. Anemone flowers are highly versatile for garden use, growing well in beds, borders, and containers alike. So, feel free to go wild and let them spread!


Editorial Director | Full Bio | + posts

Andrew is the Editorial Director at Petal Republic. He holds a BSc degree in Plant Sciences and has trained professionally at leading floristry schools in London and Paris. In amongst overseeing a global editorial team, Andrew's a passionate content creator around all things flowers, floral design, gardening, and houseplants.

Author

Andrew is the Editorial Director at Petal Republic. He holds a BSc degree in Plant Sciences and has trained professionally at leading floristry schools in London and Paris. In amongst overseeing a global editorial team, Andrew's a passionate content creator around all things flowers, floral design, gardening, and houseplants.

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