30 Amazing Types of Exotic Flowers to Admire

Exotic flowers are a fantastic way to add unusual colors or shapes to your garden. Some of my favorites include anthuriums, gardenias, and passionflowers. In this article, we’ll discover 30 amazing types of exotic flowers and a few notes about their care.

Amazing Types of Exotic Flowers

What Makes a Flower Exotic?

Exotic plants are non-native species that grow in particular ecosystems or geographical regions. Although exotic plants aren’t native to the United States, many still grow here quite happily. This means that we can cultivate wonderfully exotic plants and flowers in our gardens.

Before adding an exotic plant to your garden, check that it’s not listed as an invasive species. Each state has a list of prohibited invasive species.

30 Stunning Types of Exotic Flowers


1. Brazilian Fuchsia

Brazilian Fuchsia shrub in bloom with tubular orange and yellow flowers.

Brazilian fuchsias are compact, exotic shrubs native to Brazil. Despite its name, Brazilian fuchsia isn’t a true fuchsia. Instead, it comes from the acanthus family (Acanthaceae), whereas true fuchsias belong to the evening primrose family (Onagraceae).

Brazilian fuchsias bloom from late fall until spring in tropical areas. While in flower, these shrubs are laden with tubular, fragrant yellow flowers that turn red towards the base. Brazilian fuchsias grow up to 4 feet tall and are also known as firecracker flowers.

Brazilian fuchsias grow best in USDA Zones 10 to 11. These tropical shrubs need partial shade and well-draining soils that still retain some moisture.

Scientific Name:Justicia floribunda
Native Range:Brazil
Sunlight Requirements:Partial Shade
Flowering Colors:Yellow, red
Flowering Season:Late fall until spring

2. Brazilian Jasmine

Brazilian Jasmine in bloom displaying funnel-shaped pinkish-red flowers with five petals.

Brazilian jasmine is a prolific tropical vine native to Brazil. Brazilian jasmine isn’t a true jasmine. Instead, it comes from the Mandevilla genus within the dogbane family (Apocynaceae).

Brazilian jasmine produces funnel-shaped pinkish-red flowers with five petals. It grows as a perennial in Zones 10 to 11 and an annual in other areas. These woody vines climb up to 15 feet high.

Brazilian jasmine needs warm, humid conditions and well-draining sandy soils that still hold some moisture. These tropical vines prefer full sun but tolerate partial shade. Take care when handling Brazilian jasmine because the stems contain toxic white latex.

Scientific Name:Mandevilla sanderi
Native Range:Brazil
Sunlight Requirements:Full sun or partial shade
Flowering Colors:Pink, red
Flowering Season:Spring to fall

3. Blue Passionflower

Blue Passionflower in bloom displaying intricate blooms with blue filaments surrounded by white petals.

Blue passionflowers are some of the most popular exotic flowers. These woody tropical vines come from the passionflower family (Passifloraceae) and are native to South America. Blue passionflowers grow best in Zones 6 to 9 and can tolerate temperatures as low as 14ºF.

These flowers produce intricate blooms with blue filaments surrounded by white petals. Passionflowers also produce edible orange fruits. However, the fruits may have an unpleasant taste.

Blue passionflowers like full sun or partial shade and grow up to 40 feet tall. These exotic vines need high humidity and loose, well-draining soils that hold some moisture.

Scientific Name:Passiflora caerulea
Native Range:South America
Sunlight Requirements:Full sun or partial shade
Flowering Colors:Blue, white
Flowering Season:Summer to fall

4. Juniper-leaf Grevillea

Juniper-leaf Grevillea flower displaying spider-like yellow-green or red flowers emerge from large central flower heads.

Juniper-leaf grevilleas are prickly evergreen shrubs from the Proteaceae family. These exotic shrubs are native to parts of New South Wales and Queensland in Australia.

Juniper-leaf grevilleas bloom from winter until early summer. Tiny spider-like yellow-green or red flowers emerge from large central flower heads. Juniper-leaf grevilleas also have prickly juniper-like leaves.

Juniper-leaf grevilleas need full sun and loose, well-draining soil that is slightly acidic. These prickly shrubs grow best in Zones 8 to 9 but can tolerate temperatures as low as 14ºF.

Scientific Name:Grevillea juniperina
Native Range:Australia
Sunlight Requirements:Full sun
Flowering Colors:Yellow, red
Flowering Season:Spring to summer

5. Angel’s Trumpets (Brugmansia)

Exotic Angel's Trumpets (Brugmansia) in bloom during the growing season displaying large trumpet-shaped pink flowers.

Angel’s trumpets are beautiful exotic flowers that originally grew in the Andes in South America. These woody shrubs belong to the nightshade family (Solanaceae). Angel’s trumpets are thought to be extinct in the wild and only survive in cultivation.

Angel’s trumpets produce large trumpet-shaped flowers in several gorgeous colors. Many Brugmansia flowers produce lovely scents in the evening.

Angel’s trumpets need full sun wherever possible. These large exotic shrubs need consistently moist soils that still drain well. Brugmansia can be grown outdoors as long as temperatures stay above 50ºF. They do best in Zones 9 to 11.

Scientific Name:Brugmansia spp.
Native Range:South America
Sunlight Requirements:Full sun or partial shade
Flowering Colors:Green, orange, pink, red, yellow, white
Flowering Season:Midsummer to fall

6. Common Lantana ‘Calippo’

Common Lantana 'Calippo' displaying rounded clusters of colorful yellow tubular exotic flowers.

Common lantana ‘Calippo’ is a variety of the common lantana from the verbena family (Verbenaceae). Lantanas are native to tropical regions of the Americas. However, these vine-like shrubs are listed as invasive in many areas, including native Arizona wildflowers and in Florida.

Lantana plants produce rounded clusters of colorful tubular flowers throughout the year. In Zones 9 to 11, lantanas are perennials. They grow as annuals in colder areas. The leaves have a strong citrus scent and a rough texture like sandpaper.

Lantanas thrive in most well-draining soils and need full sun. These fast-growing exotic shrubs need humid conditions and warm temperatures around 55ºF.

Scientific Name:Lantana camara ‘Calippo’
Native Range:Tropical Americas
Sunlight Requirements:Full sun
Flowering Colors:Blue, orange, red, yellow, pink, white
Flowering Season:Spring to fall

7. Yellow Monkeyflower ‘Major Bees’

Yellow Monkeyflower 'Major Bees' displaying bright yellow flowers with red splotches.

Mimulus x cultorum ‘Major Bees’ is a cultivar of the yellow monkeyflower (Erythranthe lutea) from the lopseed family (Phrymaceae). Until recently, this species was part of the Mimulus genus but was reclassified in 2012.

Mimulus x cultorum ‘Major Bees’ produces bright yellow flowers with red splotches. These gorgeous exotic flowers are perennials in Zones 6 to 9 and annuals elsewhere. The flowers are said to resemble a monkey’s face.

These cheery plants grow up to 20 inches tall and wide. They prefer some shade and need moist, fertile soils that still drain well.

Scientific Name:Mimulus x cultorum ‘Major Bees’
Native Range:North and South America
Sunlight Requirements:Partial sun or partial shade
Flowering Colors:Yellow, red
Flowering Season:Summer

8. Indian Lotus

A cluster of Indian Lotus in bloom displaying green leaves and gorgeous cupped pink flowers.

The Indian lotus is one of the most iconic exotic flowers and is intimately connected with Buddhism and Hinduism. These aquatic plants belong to the Nelumbonaceae family.

In its native range, the Indian lotus grows in ponds or flooded fields. Indian lotus produces large green leaves and gorgeous cupped flowers. Each flower only blooms for three days and closes at night before reopening in the morning.

Indian lotus should be grown in a container or secure pond. This plant can become invasive, so keep it corralled. Indian lotus needs full sun and rich, heavy soils such as clay.

Scientific Name:Nelumbo nucifera
Native Range:India and Eastern Asia
Sunlight Requirements:Full sun
Flowering Colors:Pink, white
Flowering Season:Summer

9. Paperbarks (Melaleuca)

White Paperbarks (Melaleuca) in bloom displaying colorful flowering spikes that resemble bottlebrush flowers.

The Melaleuca genus contains approximately 300 species of exotic shrubs and trees. The genus belongs to the myrtle family (Myrtaceae). Many of these plants are commonly known as paperbarks or tea trees.

Paperbarks grow either as shrubs or trees, reaching between 3 and 115 feet high. Most paperbarks have thin, paper-like bark and produce colorful flowering spikes that resemble bottlebrush flowers. Some species, such as Melaleuca quinquenervia are considered invasive in some states.

Paperbarks need full sun and well-draining soils. Many species won’t flower until they’re a few years old. Paperbarks do best in Zones 9 to 11.

Scientific Name:Melaleuca spp.
Native Range:Australia and New Caledonia
Sunlight Requirements:Full sun
Flowering Colors:Cream, white, yellow, red, purple, pink
Flowering Season:Spring to summer

10. Bluebell Creeper

Bluebell Creeper in bloom displaying hanging bell-shaped blue flowers and glossy green leaves.

Bluebell creepers are ornamental exotic flowers from the Pittosporaceae family. Although native to Western Australia, it’s listed as an invasive plant in other areas of the country. Bluebell creepers are evergreen climbing shrubs.

Bluebell creepers produce blue, pink, or white hanging bell-shaped flowers and glossy green leaves. The flowers are followed by purple sausage-like fruits in the fall. Bluebell creepers can climb up to 6 feet tall.

Bluebell creepers need well-draining soils that still hold some moisture. These exotic shrubs grow best in Zones 10 to 11 and tolerate temperatures down to 20ºF. They prefer full sun or partial shade.

Scientific Name:Billardiera heterophylla
Native Range:Western Australia
Sunlight Requirements:Full sun or partial shade
Flowering Colors:Blue, pink, white
Flowering Season:Summer to fall

11. Jacaranda

Jacaranda exotic tree in bloom displaying plumes of lavender colored blooms on the branches.

The Jacaranda genus contains approximately 50 species of breathtaking exotic trees from the trumpet vine family (Bignoniaceae). Native to South America, Jacaranda trees have been introduced to other areas. In some regions, these trees are now invasive.

Jacaranda trees grow between 65 and 100 feet tall, although dwarf varieties are good for containers. Jacaranda trees produce fabulous, fragrant blue or purple flowers. Blue Jacaranda (Jacaranda mimosifolia) is the most popular species.

Jacaranda trees prefer full sun and warm conditions in Zones 10 and 11. However, they can handle occasional temperatures as low as 20ºF. Jacaranda trees need sandy, well-draining soils.

Scientific Name:Jacaranda spp.
Native Range:South America
Sunlight Requirements:Full sun
Flowering Colors:Blue, purple, white
Flowering Season:Spring to summer

12. Lobster Claw Plant (Heliconia)

Lobster Claw Plant (Heliconia) displaying pendulous flowering bracts in shades of red tinged with yellow and green.

The Heliconia genus, also known as lobster claw plants, is the only genus in the Heliconiaceae family. These colorful exotic flowers get their name from the distinctive shape of their flowering bracts. Heliconias also have large, long green leaves similar to those of banana plants.

Heliconias need warm, tropical conditions in Zones 10b to 11. These impressive exotic flowers cannot tolerate frost or cold, so they need winter protection in other zones. Heliconias also need full sun or partial shade and fertile, well-draining soils. Most varieties grow between 3 and 6 feet tall.

Scientific Name:Heliconia spp.
Native Range:Tropical Americas, West Pacific
Sunlight Requirements:Full sun or partial shade
Flowering Colors:Green, orange, red, yellow
Flowering Season:Summer to fall

13. Frangipani (Plumeria)

Frangipani (Plumeria) flowers in bloom displaying brilliant white petals with yellow centers.

Also known as frangipani, plumeria belongs to the dogbane family (Apocynaceae). These beautiful deciduous flowering shrubs were sacred to the Aztec and Maya cultures. People in Hawaii and other Pacific islands use frangipani blossoms to create lei garlands.

Frangipani produce masses of richly fragrant blooms on their succulent-like stems. The flowers don’t produce nectar and trick moths into pollinating them. These flowers need warm, humid conditions in Zones 10 to 12. They will struggle if temperatures drop below 40ºF.

If you’re growing and caring for Frangipani at home, ensure you provide full sun and well-draining soils. These fabulous flowers are drought and salt-tolerant, making them suitable for coastal areas.

Scientific Name:Plumeria spp.
Native Range:Central and South America, the Caribbean, Florida, Hawaii
Sunlight Requirements:Full sun
Flowering Colors:Pink, white, red, yellow
Flowering Season:Spring to summer

14. Chinese Hibiscus

A large orange Chinese Hibiscus flower in bloom with a long, prominent red stamen.

Also known as Hawaiian hibiscus or tropical hibiscus, Chinese hibiscus belongs to the mallow family (Malvaceae). Originally native to Vanuatu, Chinese hibiscus has spread to many tropical regions. These flowering evergreen shrubs can reach up to 16 feet tall and 10 feet wide.

Chinese hibiscus has gorgeous flowers with five ruffled petals. Each flower has prominent anthers with orange tips. Chinese hibiscus grows well in Zones 9 to 12.

Chinese hibiscus grows best in full sun and needs moist, well-draining soils. These exquisite exotic flowers also need a sheltered spot. Chinese hibiscus can also grow indoors in colder regions.

Scientific Name:Hibiscus rosa-sinensis
Native Range:Vanuatu
Sunlight Requirements:Full sun or partial shade
Flowering Colors:Red, orange, yellow, peach, pink, purple, white
Flowering Season:Summer to fall

15. Flowering Banana

Flowering Banana plant growing in an exotic setting showcasing very large green leaves and purple bracts surrounding orange and yellow flowers.

Although celebrated for their fruits, most species of banana plants produce beautiful flowers too. The flowering banana (Musa ornata) is one such species in the banana family (Musaceae).

Once a flowering banana plant is two or three years old, it starts producing flowers. These consist of pink or purple bracts surrounding orange or yellow flowers. Flowering banana also has large blue-green leaves that can grow up to 6 feet long.

Flowering banana plants require full sun and warm conditions in Zones 9 to 11. Grow them in sheltered areas with moist, rich soils that also drain well.

Scientific Name:Musa ornata
Native Range:Southeast Asia
Sunlight Requirements:Full sun
Flowering Colors:Orange, yellow, pink, purple
Flowering Season:Summer

16. Orchids

A red exotic orchid plant in bloom.

Orchids are some of the most popular and exquisite exotic flowers. The Orchidaceae family contains at least 28,000 recognized species. Many popular types of orchids are grown as houseplants, but some species can be grown outdoors.

Orchids are found in most parts of the world and inhabit several climates. Orchids grow as either epiphytic or terrestrial plants. Most orchids produce incredibly colorful and detailed flowers with striking markings.

Most orchids need bright, indirect light indoors or partial shade outdoors. Different orchid species require different temperatures and climates. Epiphytic orchids need specialized growing mediums made from bark and moss.

Scientific Name:Orchidaceae
Native Range:Most of the world
Sunlight Requirements:Partial shade
Flowering Colors:Blue, purple, pink, orange, red, yellow, green, white
Flowering Season:Fall to spring

17. Long-leaf Wax Flower

Long-leaf Wax Flower displaying five-petal flower heads in shades of soft pink.

Long-leaf wax flowers are exotic flowering shrubs from the rue family (Rutaceae). These gorgeous plants are native to Southeastern Australia. Long-leaf wax flowers grow over 6 feet tall.

Long-leaf wax flowers have papery or leathery leaves and pink or white flowers. The leaves produce an aromatic scent. The stems are covered with wart-like bumps.

Long-leaf wax flowers need full sun or partial shade, especially in hot climates. These shrubs grow well in Zones 8 to 10. Long-leaf wax flowers thrive in most well-draining soils and grow on rocky, sandy slopes in their native range.

Scientific Name:Philotheca myoporoides
Native Range:Southeastern Australia
Sunlight Requirements:Full sun or partial shade
Flowering Colors:Pink, white
Flowering Season:Fall to spring

18. Tarweed Fiddleneck

Tarweed Fiddleneck displaying spikes of yellow tubular flowers with five petals.

Tarweed fiddleneck is a beautiful flower native to Western North America. It comes from the borage family (Boraginaceae). This species has also spread across the United States and even to Europe and Australia.

Tarweed fiddleneck produces spikes of yellow or orange tubular flowers with five petals. It grows as an annual herb and has thin, hairy green leaves.

Tarweed fiddleneck prefers full sun or partial shade. These plants also need well-draining soils that still hold some moisture. Always wear gloves, as tarweed fiddleneck can cause skin irritation.

Scientific Name:Amsinckia lycopsoides
Native Range:Western North America
Sunlight Requirements:Full sun or partial shade
Flowering Colors:Yellow, orange
Flowering Season:Spring to summer

19. Sugarbushes (Protea)

Sugarbushes (Protea) growing natively in a tropical hillside location with large red flower heads with colorful upward-curving bracts.

Sugarbushes are native to South Africa and come from the Proteaceae family. These exotic flowering shrubs thrive in warm, dry conditions in Zones 9 to 12. Sugarbushes make excellent cut or dried flowers.

Sugarbushes have large flower heads with colorful upward-curving bracts. Most sugarbush varieties grow between 6 and 25 feet tall. Despite their beautiful flowers, these shrubs can handle hot, sunny climates.

Sugarbushes require full sun and loose, well-draining soils. Sandy soils are ideal. Sugarbushes cannot tolerate temperatures below 23ºF. Established sugarbushes are fairly drought-tolerant, so water once per week.

Scientific Name:Protea spp.
Native Range:South Africa
Sunlight Requirements:Full sun
Flowering Colors:Orange, yellow, red, white, pink, green
Flowering Season:Winter to spring

20. Oriental Lilies

Oriental Lilies displaying large white and pink striped flower heads with six petals and large anthers.

Along with Asiatic lilies, Oriental lilies are among the main lily groups. Both groups are “true lilies” from the Liliaceae family. Oriental lilies are found throughout the Northern Hemisphere, including eastern and southeastern Asia.

Oriental lilies are famous for their large, colorful flowers. These exquisite exotic blooms have six petals and large anthers. Oriental lilies produce sweet fragrances, unlike Asiatic lilies.

Oriental lilies thrive in Zones 4 to 9 and need full sun or partial shade. Lilies prefer rich, acidic soils that drain well but hold some moisture. Oriental lilies are perennials that grow from bulbs.

Scientific Name:Lilium spp.
Native Range:Northern Hemisphere
Sunlight Requirements:Full sun or partial shade
Flowering Colors:Pink, red, white
Flowering Season:Summer to fall

21. Canna Lily ‘Tropicanna’

Canna Lily 'Tropicanna' displaying exotic yellow and orange speckled petals on the flower heads.

Canna lilies are breathtaking exotic flowers in the Cannaceae family. Originally native to Southern regions of the Americas, several cultivars have been developed across the world. One of the most striking is the Canna lily ‘Tropicanna’ Series.

Canna ‘Tropicanna’ specimens produce scintillating orange or red flowers and dramatic variegated green leaves. Some members of the series also have chocolate-brown foliage. Canna ‘Tropicanna’ cultivars do best in Zones 8 to 11.

Canna lilies thrive in full sun and bloom from summer until fall. Some varieties reach up to 6 feet tall. Canna lilies need rich, well-draining soils that hold some moisture.

Scientific Name:Canna ‘Tropicanna’ Series
Native Range:Southern US and Central and South America
Sunlight Requirements:Full sun
Flowering Colors:Orange, yellow
Flowering Season:Summer to fall

22. Gardenias

A single creamy white gardenia flower in bloom against green foliage.

Gardenias are popular exotic flowering shrubs that work well in gardens. The Gardenia genus comes from the coffee family (Rubiaceae) and contains approximately 130 recognized species.

Gardenia shrubs grow between 3 and 50 feet tall. These plants produce glossy evergreen leaves and beautiful, intricate flowers. In some species, each flower can grow up to 5 inches wide. Many Gardenia species also have fragrant blooms.

Gardenias grow well in Zones 6 to 11 and prefer warm, humid conditions. Gardenias need partial shade in hotter areas but tolerate full sun in cooler climates. Gardenias also require moist, fertile soils.

Scientific Name:Gardenia spp.
Native Range:Africa, Asia, Australia, Pacific Islands
Sunlight Requirements:Partial shade
Flowering Colors:Pink, white, yellow
Flowering Season:Spring to summer

23. Calla Lilies

A cluster of white, tubular calla lillies grows in a valley setting in an exotic location.

Also known as arum lilies, Calla lilies are beautiful exotic flowers from Southern Africa. Despite their name, these herbaceous perennials aren’t true arums or true lilies. Instead, they belong to the Zantedeschia genus in the arum family (Araceae).

Calla lilies produce large flowers consisting of spathes and a yellow spadix. These perennials grow from bulbs and come in early, mid, and late-season varieties.

Calla lilies need full sun or partial shade and conditions in Zones 8 to 10. Calla lilies grow as annuals in colder areas. These exotic flowers require rich, well-draining soils that still retain some moisture.

Scientific Name:Zantedeschia spp.
Native Range:Southern Africa
Sunlight Requirements:Full sun or partial shade
Flowering Colors:Pink, white, yellow
Flowering Season:Spring to summer

24. Anthuriums

Lipstick red anthurium plants in bloom.

Also known as flamingo flowers or laceleaf plants, Anthuriums are popular tropical houseplants from the arum family (Araceae). Some Anthuriums have wonderfully exotic flowers with glossy red or pink spathes and a spadix. Others have large, veined dark green leaves.

As houseplants, Anthuriums need bright, indirect light and warm, humid conditions. Water Anthuriums approximately once a week and provide rich, well-draining soils.

Some Anthuriums can be grown outdoors in Zones 11 and 12. Outdoor Anthuriums need partial shade and a sheltered spot. They also need warm temperatures and high humidity levels.

Scientific Name:Anthurium spp.
Native Range:Central and South America
Sunlight Requirements:Partial shade
Flowering Colors:Red, pink, white, yellow
Flowering Season:Throughout the year

25. Celosia

A cluster of colorful celosia flowers in bloom displaying plumes of blooms above forest green leaves and foliage.

Celosia are gorgeous exotic flowers that are pretty easy to care for. These annuals come from the amaranth family (Amaranthaceae). Although mainly used as ornamentals, Celosia is also grown as food crops in parts of Asia and South America.

Celosia flowers come in three main types; crested celosia (Celosia cristata), plumed celosia (Celosia argentea), and spiked celosia (Celosia spicata). Each type produces slightly different flower heads.

Celosia thrives in Zones 2 to 9 as annuals but can be perennials in Zones 10 to 12. Celosia flowers need full sun and well-draining soils that hold some moisture.

Scientific Name:Celosia spp.
Native Range:East Africa
Sunlight Requirements:Full sun
Flowering Colors:Pink, purple, orange, red, yellow, white
Flowering Season:Spring to fall

26. Bird of Paradise

Bird of Paradise plants displaying exotic blue and orange beak-like flowers that emerge from green spathes.

Bird of Paradise plants are impressive exotic flowers that can be grown indoors or outdoors. These flowers belong to the Strelitziaceae family and hail from South Africa.

Bird of Paradise plants produces blue and orange beak-like flowers that emerge from green spathes. The arrangement of these flowers resembles the plumage of a bird of paradise.

Indoors, Bird of Paradise plants needs bright light and warm, humid conditions. Bird of Paradise plants also need well-draining soils that still hold some moisture. Outdoors, Bird of Paradise plants grows best in sunny areas in Zones 10 to 12.

Scientific Name:Strelitzia spp.
Native Range:South Africa
Sunlight Requirements:Full sun
Flowering Colors:Blue, white, orange, yellow
Flowering Season:Winter to spring

27. Calico Flower

A large, exotic Calico Flower in bloom with dark brown and purple markings that resemble a tobacco pipe.

Also known as elegant Dutchman’s pipe, calico flowers are intriguing exotic flowers from South America. These plants are evergreen climbing vines from the birthwort family (Aristolochiaceae).

Calico flowers are creamy-white with dark brown or purple markings. These unusual flowers resemble a tobacco pipe and produce a carrion scent. This attracts insects such as butterflies and flies to pollinate the plant.

Calico flowers are listed as an invasive species in some southern states, so check your local list. Calico flowers need full sun or partial shade and thrive in Zones 9 to 12. Calico flowers cannot handle temperatures below 45ºF.

Scientific Name:Aristolochia elegans
Native Range:South America
Sunlight Requirements:Full sun or partial shade
Flowering Colors:Brown, purple, white
Flowering Season:Summer

28. Weeping Bottlebrush

Weeping Bottlebrush in bloom displaying pink, feathery flower spikes.

Weeping bottlebrushes are exotic flowering shrubs from the myrtle family (Myrtaceae). Weeping bottlebrushes are originally native to Australia. However, horticulturalists have bred several cultivars, including Callistemon viminalis ‘Hot Pink’.

Callistemon viminalis ‘Hot Pink’ dazzles with its pink, feathery flower spikes from summer until fall. This cultivar grows up to 5 feet tall and 3 feet wide. It’s hardy down to 23ºF and thrives in Zones 9 to 11.

Weeping bottlebrushes need full sun and sheltered spots. These shrubs also require moist but well-draining soils.

Scientific Name:Callistemon viminalis ‘Hot Pink’
Native Range:Australia
Sunlight Requirements:Full sun
Flowering Colors:Pink
Flowering Season:Summer to fall

29. Calathea Flowers

Calathea Flowers displaying tiny, slender pink flower heads that emerge from exotic green leaves and foliage.

Although Calatheas are highly prized as houseplants, these tropical perennials also produce flowers. However, it takes work to get them to bloom indoors.

Calatheas belong to the arrowroot family (Marantaceae) and are native to tropical parts of the Americas. Calathea flowers consist of three petals and three sepals that can be purple, white, or yellow. Calatheas also produce bracts to attract insects.

As houseplants, Calatheas need indirect light and well-draining soils. Calatheas also need warm, humid conditions. Water Calatheas whenever the top two inches of soil feel dry.

Scientific Name:Calathea spp.
Native Range:Tropical Central and South America
Sunlight Requirements:Partial shade
Flowering Colors:Purple, white, yellow
Flowering Season:Summer

30. Amaryllis

Bright red Amaryllis flowers in bloom with dramatic funel-shaped blooms.

Amaryllis are some of the most popular and prized exotic flowers. Amaryllis are native to South Africa and belong to the Amaryllidaceae family.

Amaryllis have dramatic funnel-shaped, lily-like flowers that are usually white, purple, or pink. The flowers often have colorful red veins as well. Amaryllis flowers grow from bulbs that should be planted in winter.

Amaryllis are hardy in Zones 7 to 10. These exotic flowers need full sun and well-draining soils that still retain moisture. Amaryllis also needs warm temperatures during the growing season and cooler conditions during the winter to stimulate its blooms.

Scientific Name:Amaryllis spp.
Native Range:South Africa
Sunlight Requirements:Full sun
Flowering Colors:White, pink, purple
Flowering Season:Summer to fall

Types of Exotic Flowers FAQs:

What is the Most Popular Exotic Tropical Flower?

Many exotic flowers are popular with gardeners. Well-known exotic flowers like orchids, bird of paradise, anthuriums, and oriental lilies are usually the most popular.

Can You Grow Exotic Flowers in Cold Weather Climates?

Depending on their recommended USDA Zones, you can grow some exotic flowers in cold weather climates. Usually, this means growing them indoors or in a greenhouse. Most exotic flowers need warm, humid conditions to thrive. However, some can be surprisingly tolerant of cool temperatures.

What Are Popular Exotic Flowers to Grow in Brazil?

Popular exotic flowers to grow in Brazil include begonias, Brazilian jasmine, Brazilian fuchsias, and Cattleya labiata orchids.

When Do Exotic Orchid Flowers Bloom?

Most exotic orchid flowers bloom between fall and spring. However, this depends on their recommended USDA Zones and the surrounding climate. Always check when your chosen species is supposed to bloom.

What is the Difference Between Tropical Flowers and Exotic Flowers?

Tropical flowers are specimens that grow in tropical climates. The term “exotic flowers” is just a way of describing non-native flowers not found in particular areas.

Wrapping Up:

Exotic flowers can add incredible colors and forms to any garden space. Popular exotic flowers include anthuriums, gardenias, orchids, oriental lilies, and passionflowers. Most exotic flowers require warm, humid conditions. However, you can still grow exotic flowers in cold climates, either indoors or in a greenhouse.

Editorial Director | andrew@petalrepublic.com | Full Bio

Andrew is the Editorial Director at Petal Republic. He holds a BSc degree in Plant Sciences and has trained professionally at leading floristry schools in London and Paris. In amongst overseeing a global editorial team, Andrew's a passionate content creator around all things flowers, floral design, gardening, and houseplants.

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