50 Stunning British Native Wildflowers

Britain’s varied landscapes are home to a rich array of beautiful native wildflowers. Many thrive in open grasslands, shaded woodlands, or alongside rugged and spectacular coastlines. Join me as I explore 50 stunning British native wildflowers.

British Native Flowers and Wildflowers

British Isles Native Range and Growing Zones

The British Isles are a collection of islands situated in the North Atlantic. Britain experiences a moist, temperate climate and usually gets a lot of rainfall. Britain’s climate corresponds to USDA Growing Zones 6 to 9, meaning that Britain’s native wildflowers thrive in these areas.

How are Britain’s Native Flowers Defined?

Britain’s native plants are defined as species that survived in or colonized Britain after the last Ice Age. This definition comes from the Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland. Britain also has many naturalized non-native species that have since been introduced to the country.

50 Types of Native British Wildflowers


1) Bird’s-foot-trefoil

Bird's-foot-trefoil growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Lotus corniculatus
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun
Mature Height:Up to 1 foot

Bird’s-foot-trefoil is a herbaceous perennial from the legume or pea family (Fabaceae). In Britain, these plants are also known as eggs and bacon due to the color of their flowers. These British native flowers are reasonably low-growing plants with a spreading habit.

Bird’s-foot-trefoil has yellow pea-like flowers with red veins. The flowers resemble clusters of slippers. Once the flowers finish, bird’s-foot-trefoil produces seed pods that resemble bird’s feet, hence the name.

2) Bittersweet

Bittersweet flowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Solanum dulcamara
Flowering Season:Summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:3 to 5 feet

Bittersweet is a woody herbaceous perennial from the nightshade family (Solanaceae). While not as poisonous as other nightshade plants, bittersweet is still slightly toxic. Bittersweet is native to parts of Asia and Europe, including Great Britain.

Bittersweet is a climber with greenish-yellow oval-shaped leaves. The purple star-shaped flowers bloom during the summer and have bright yellow stamens. The flowers are followed by red berries that resemble tomatoes.

For more, see our in-depth guide to popular flowers that are toxic to cats, dogs, and other pets.

3) Blackthorn

Blackthorn flowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Prunus spinosa
Flowering Season:Spring
Light Requirements:Full sun
Mature Height:10 to 12 feet

Blackthorn is a flowering deciduous tree from the rose family (Rosaceae). Blackthorn belongs to the Prunus genus and is also known as sloe. These British native flowers are native throughout Britain, Europe, and western parts of Asia.

Blackthorn is one of the earliest trees to bloom during the spring before it produces leaves. It has clusters of white flowers with long stamens followed by purple berries or sloes. Blackthorn also has long, sharp spines.

4) Bluebell

Bluebells flowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Hyacinthoides non-scripta
Flowering Season:Spring
Light Requirements:Partial to full shade
Mature Height:1 to 2 feet

Bluebells are one of the most beloved native British wildflowers. These British native flowers are bulbous perennials from the asparagus family (Asparagaceae). Bluebells thrive in shaded woodlands in Britain and Western Europe and grow best in USDA Zones 4 to 10

Bluebells produce clumps of slender sword-shaped leaves. They produce racemes of nodding bell-shaped blue or violet flowers during the spring. In Britain, bluebells are an essential indicator of ancient woodlands.

5) Bugle

Bugle flowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Ajuga reptans
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Partial to full shade
Mature Height:Up to 8 inches

Bugle is a creeping herbaceous perennial from the mint or sage family (Lamiaceae). This low-growing plant grows best in acidic moorlands and grasslands or shady woodlands across Britain and Ireland.

Bugle has rosettes of oval-shaped basal leaves with smaller pairs of opposite leaves on the stalks. They produce spikes of tiny blue or purple flowers at the end of the stalk. Each flower has three prominent lower lobes.

6) Common Buttercup

Yellow Common Buttercup flowers in bloom
Scientific Name:Ranunculus acris
Flowering Season:Spring to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:1 to 3 feet

Common buttercups are bright, cheery native British wildflowers from the buttercup family (Ranunculaceae). Also known as giant buttercups or meadow buttercups, these plants are native to grasslands and meadows across Britain, Europe, and Asia.

Common buttercups have golden yellow cup-shaped flowers with five petals that slightly overlap. These native British flowers also have compound leaves that have three lobes. Common buttercups quickly colonize gardens and parks in Zones 4 to 8.

7) Common Centaury

Pink Common Centaury flowers in bloom
Scientific Name:Centaurium erythraea
Flowering Season:Summer to fall
Light Requirements:Partial shade
Mature Height:Up to 1 foot

Common centaury is an attractive biennial wildflower from the gentian family (Gentianaceae). They grow in open areas like heaths, grasslands, and sand dunes. These plants are native to Britain, Europe, North Africa, and western Asia.

Common centaury grows upright from a rosette of basal leaves. During the summer, they produce clusters of star-shaped pink or lavender flowers. Each flower opens up during the morning and closes in the afternoon.

8) Common Cow-wheat

Yellow Common Cow-wheat flowers in bloom
Scientific Name:Melampyrum pratense
Flowering Season:Spring to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:8 to 20 inches

Common cow-wheat is an annual wildflower from the broomrape family (Orobanchaceae). They are native to shady woodlands across Britain and are an indicator of ancient woodland.

Common cow-wheat has long, lanceolate leaves and tubular yellow flowers that bloom in pairs along the raceme. After flowering, common cow-wheat produces seeds with fleshy tops called elaiosomes. Wood ants disperse the seeds by carrying them back to their nests.

9) Common Daisy

Common Daisy flowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Bellis perennis
Flowering Season:Spring to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:Up to 4 inches

Common daisies are some of Britain’s most iconic and popular native wildflowers. Carpets of these cheery flowers cover gardens, parks, and open grasslands from spring until fall. They are herbaceous perennials that belong to the daisy family (Asteraceae).

These British native flowers grow via creeping rhizomes and produce clumps of small, rounded leaves. Common daisies have small flowers with yellow central florets surrounded by white petals.

10) Common Dog-violet

Common Dog-violet flowers in bloom
Scientific Name:Viola riviniana
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to full shade
Mature Height:Up to 5 inches

Common dog-violets are vibrant perennials from the Violaceae family. They are native to grasslands and woodlands across Britain. Common dog-violets are low-growing plants that spread via rhizomes.

These native British flowers have small heart-shaped foliage that is dark green. Common dog-violets bloom from spring until summer and produce purple or violet flowers with two upper petals and three lower petals. Unlike other violets, common dog-violets have no scent.

11) Common Hawthorn

Common Hawthorn flowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Crataegus monogyna
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:25 to 30 feet

Common hawthorn is a fragrant flowering tree from the rose family (Rosaceae). It is also known as mayblossom because it starts flowering in May. Common hawthorn is native to Britain, Europe, and parts of Africa and Asia.

Common hawthorn has medium green, deeply lobed leaves. In May, common hawthorn explodes with masses of small white flowers, which have a pleasantly thick sweet scent.

12) Common Knapweed

Pink Common Knapweed in bloom
Scientific Name:Centaurea nigra
Flowering Season:Summer to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:1 to 3 feet

Common knapweed is a nectar-rich wildflower from the aster or daisy family (Asteraceae). They are native to Britain and Europe but have spread to other areas, where it’s sometimes considered to be invasive.

Common knapweed is a herbaceous perennial with hairy oblong leaves, producing purple flowers like thistles. These flowers sit above rounded clusters of specialized brown bracts called phyllaries.

13) Common Poppies

Red Common Poppies
Scientific Name:Papaver rhoeas
Flowering Season:Summer
Light Requirements:Full sun
Mature Height:1 to 2 feet

Common poppies are annual wildflowers from the poppy family (Papaveraceae). They are also known as corn poppies or field poppies. Common poppies are native to temperate climates in Britain, Europe, Africa, and Asia.

These native British flowers have red saucer-shaped flowers with black centers. These flowers bloom on hairy stems above delicate pinnate leaves. Common poppies readily self-seed but are becoming rarer in Britain due to habitat loss. They thrive in Zones 3 to 9.

14) Common Rock-rose

Yellow Common Rock-rose flowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Helianthemum nummularium
Flowering Season:Summer to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:1 to 1.5 feet

Common rock-rose is an evergreen shrub or trailing plant from the rock-rose family (Cistaceae). They bloom prolifically even though each bloom doesn’t last long. Common rock-rose is native to chalk slopes and grasslands across Britain and Europe.

These British native flowers have lanceolate leaves with woolly white undersides. Wild common rock-roses produce bright yellow cup-shaped flowers from May until July. These wildflowers are important food plants for various butterflies.

15) Common Spotted Orchid

Pink Common Spotted Orchid flowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Dactylorhiza fuchsii
Flowering Season:Summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:1 to 2 feet

The common spotted orchid is Britain’s most common native orchid. These types of orchids thrive in various habitats, including woodlands and marshes.

Common spotted orchids produce a rosette of green leaves with purple oval markings, hence the common name. During the summer, these British native flowers produce dense spikes of small pink, purple, or white flowers. Each flower displays pink or purple spots on its lower petals.

16) Common Toadflax

Yellow Common Toadflax flowers in bloom
Scientific Name:Linaria vulgaris
Flowering Season:Summer to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:2 to 2.5 feet

Common toadflax is a herbaceous perennial from the plantain family (Plantaginaceae). It’s widespread across Britain and favors grasslands and disturbed land. It’s also known as yellow toadflax or butter-and-eggs.

Common toadflax has narrow green leaves and upright stems. Yellow snapdragon-like flowers bloom at the end of the stalks from June until November. These native British flowers are often grown as a cut flower and may have medicinal benefits.

17) Common Valerian

Common Valerian flowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Valeriana officinalis
Flowering Season:Summer to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:4 to 5 feet

Common valerian is a herbaceous perennial wildflower from the honeysuckle family (Caprifoliaceae). They are native to Britain, Europe, and Asia and have been used as a medicinal herb since ancient times.

Common valerian has tall stalks with clusters of pinnate leaves around the nodes. During the summer, common valerian produces umbel-like clusters of tiny white flowers. These clusters attract pollinators like hoverflies and butterflies.

18) Common Vetch

Common Vetch flowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Vicia sativa
Flowering Season:Spring to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun
Mature Height:2 to 2.5 feet

Common vetch is an annual wildflower from the legume or pea family (Fabaceae). It has a scrambling habit and thrives in open habitats like grasslands and coastlines. They are often cultivated for livestock fodder.

These British native flowers produce upright stems with alternating sets of oblong leaves. Each set of leaves has a branching tendril at the tip. Common vetch also has pink, purple, or white pea-like flowers.

19) Cowslip

Yellow Cowslip flowers in bloom
Scientific Name:Primula veris
Flowering Season:Spring
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:8 to 10 inches

Cowslips are fragrant yellow flowers that are evergreen or semi-evergreen herbaceous perennials from the primrose family (Primulaceae). They grow best in open grasslands and meadows. Unfortunately, cowslip numbers have declined because of habitat loss, and are, therefore, a protected species in Britain.

Cowslips have rosettes of oblong or slightly oval-shaped leaves. These native British flowers also produce clusters of nodding bright yellow bell-shaped flowers during the spring. Cowslip flowers have a lovely scent similar to apricots.

20) Daffodil

Yellow Daffodil flowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Narcissus pseudonarcissus
Flowering Season:Spring
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:Up to 1 foot

Wild daffodils are flowering perennials from the Narcissus genus in the Amaryllis family (Amaryllidaceae). Wild daffodils grow from bulbs and burst into bloom during the spring. These British native flowers differ slightly from garden daffodils and thrive in shaded woodlands.

Wild daffodils have large trumpet-shaped flowers with bright yellow inner petals and pale yellow outer petals. They are usually shorter than garden daffodils and have slender grayish-green leaves.

21) Dog Rose

Pink Dog Rose flowers in bloom
Scientific Name:Rosa canina
Flowering Season:Summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:5 to 15 feet

The dog rose is a flowering perennial deciduous shrub from the rose family (Rosaceae). The dog rose is native to hedgerows, grasslands, and woodlands across Britain.

Dog roses have pinnate leaves that release a pleasant scent when crushed. During the summer, dog roses produce pink or white flowers with five petals and yellow central stamens. The stems are covered in small, hooked thorns. After flowering, dog roses produce red rosehips.

22) Field Scabious

Field Scabious flowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Knautia arvensis
Flowering Season:Summer to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun or partial shade
Mature Height:1 to 3 feet

Field scabious is a herbaceous perennial wildflower from the honeysuckle family (Caprifoliaceae). These British native flowers have large single flower heads with white inner florets and pale blue outer petals. Field scabious flowers resemble pincushions.

Field scabious is found throughout Britain and Europe. These wildflowers thrive in open meadows and grasslands and can tolerate chalk or limestone soils. They are also important plants for pollinators such as bees and butterflies.

23) Forget-me-not

Forget-me-not flowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Myosotis scorpioides
Flowering Season:Summer to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:Up to 1 foot

Forget-me-nots are charming British native wildflowers from the borage family (Boraginaceae). They have upright stems and slender oblong leaves and produce clusters of small light blue flowers with five petals and yellow centers.

Forget-me-nots are native to Britain, Europe, and parts of Asia. They prefer moist habitats such as marshes, bogs, ponds, and riverbanks. Forget-me-nots have a long flowering season, blooming in mid-spring until the first fall frosts.

24) Foxglove

Colorful Foxglove flowers in bloom
Scientific Name:Digitalis purpurea
Flowering Season:Summer to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:3 to 5 feet

Foxgloves are one of Britain’s most famous native wildflowers. They are biennials from the plantain family (Plantaginaceae). Foxgloves are native to Britain and Europe and grow best in woodlands and heathlands.

Foxgloves have basal rosettes of oval-shaped leaves with toothed edges and hairs. During the summer, foxgloves produce tall spikes of pink or purple bell-shaped flowers. The flowers are densely clustered together. However, foxgloves are also poisonous.

25) Great Burnet

Great Burnet flowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Sanguisorba officinalis
Flowering Season:Summer to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun
Mature Height:3 to 4 feet

Great Burnet is a herbaceous perennial from the rose family (Rosaceae). These plants are native to Britain, Europe, and parts of Asia and North America. Great burnet plants thrive in grasslands and floodplains.

The plants have oval-shaped leaves with toothed edges. These perennials produce upright stalks topped with clusters of small dark red flowers. Great burnet plants can live for up to a decade.

26) Greater Stitchwort

White Greater Stitchwort flowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Stellaria holostea
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:1 to 1.5 feet

Also known as star-of-Bethlehem, greater stitchwort is a herbaceous perennial from the carnation family (Caryophyllaceae). They are native to Britain and other parts of Central and Western Europe. It grows best in fields and woodlands.

Greater stitchwort has white flowers with five petals and yellow stamens. Each petal is deeply divided into two lobes. Greater stitchwort disperses its seeds like projectiles when disturbed.

27) Hedge Woundwort

Hedge Woundwort flowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Stachys sylvatica
Flowering Season:Summer to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:2 to 2.5 feet

Hedge woundwort is a herbaceous perennial from the mint family (Lamiaceae) found in hedgerows and woodlands across Britain. When hedge woundwort’s leaves are crushed, they produce an unpleasant scent.

Hedge woundwort has upright, hairy stalks with pairs of opposite toothed leaves. The small dark pink or purple flowers have white markings and emerge in pairs on a spike at the end of the stem.

28) Honeysuckle

Honeysuckle flowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Lonicera periclymenum
Flowering Season:Summer to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:15 to 25 feet

Common honeysuckle is a deciduous climbing vine from the honeysuckle family (Caprifoliaceae). Honeysuckle is widespread thanks to its sweet summer fragrance. They grow best in woodlands and hedgerows across Britain.

Common honeysuckle has opposite pairs of green, oval-shaped leaves with short stems. These British native flowers produce clusters of cream to yellow or orange trumpet-shaped flowers with pink and red flushes. The flowers are followed by red berries.

29) Lady Orchid

Lady Orchid flowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Orchis purpurea
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:1 to 3 feet

Lady orchids are herbaceous perennial orchids native to Britain. Unfortunately, lady orchids are becoming increasingly rare due to habitat loss. They grow best on woodland slopes and mixed woodlands in parts of southern Britain.

Lady orchids have basal rosettes of broad, oblong leaves and upright stalks and produce dense spikes of purple flowers. Lady orchid flowers have pale pink labellums and dark purple markings.

30) Lesser Celandine

Yellow Lesser Celandine wildflowers in bloom
Scientific Name:Ranunculus ficaria
Flowering Season:Spring
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:Up to 1 foot

Lesser celandine is a herbaceous perennial from the buttercup family (Ranunculaceae). These low-growing plants inhabit woodlands and grasslands across Britain. Lesser celandine’s bright, cheery flowers are a welcome sign of spring.

These British native flowers spread via tubers and grow in clumps of dark green heart-shaped glossy leaves. Lesser celandine also has golden yellow flowers with between eight and twelve slender petals. The flowers open fully when exposed to bright sunshine.

31) Marsh Marigold

Marsh Marigold wildflowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Caltha palustris
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:1 to 2 feet

Marsh marigolds are herbaceous perennials from the buttercup family. These British native flowers spread via rhizomes that produce clumps of large leathery dark green leaves. Marsh marigolds have bright yellow flowers in spring and summer with five petals and yellow stamens.

They are also known as kingcups due to the shape of their flowers. Marsh marigolds grow best in moist meadows and woodlands. Marsh marigolds also grow along riverbanks.

32) Meadowsweet

Meadowsweet wildflowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Filipendula ulmaria
Flowering Season:Summer to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:3 to 4 feet

Meadowsweet is a herbaceous perennial from the rose family native to Britain, Europe, and parts of Asia. Meadowsweet is also known as mead wort and grows best in moist meadows, moorland, and along riverbanks.

They have tall, upright reddish stems with compound leaves that have pinnate leaflets. These leaflets are arranged alternately. Meadowsweet also produces frothy flower heads of small cream or white flowers.

33) Oxeye Daisy

Oxeye Daisy wildflowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Leucanthemum vulgare
Flowering Season:Summer to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun
Mature Height:1 to 2 feet

Oxeye daisies are one of Britain’s most common native wildflowers. They thrive on roadsides and grasslands across Britain and Ireland. Oxeye daisies are herbaceous perennials from the aster or daisy family.

Oxeye daisies have large daisy-like flowers with ranks of slender white petals surrounding yellow central florets. In addition, they also have large oblong or spoon-shaped leaves that have toothed edges. Oxeye daisies spread via rhizomes and can be invasive.

34) Primrose

Colorful Primrose flowers in bloom
Scientific Name:Primula vulgaris
Flowering Season:Spring
Light Requirements:Partial shade
Mature Height:Up to 8 inches

Primroses are some of Britain’s most recognizable native woodland wildflowers. These British native flowers grow in shady woodlands as clumps of broad, wrinkled leaves. During the spring, primroses produce pale yellow star-shaped flowers with bright yellow centers.

Primroses are herbaceous perennials from the primrose family (Primulaceae). These plants are native to Britain, Europe, and parts of Africa and Asia. Primroses are reasonably hardy and are vital food plants for several butterfly species.

35) Ragged-robin

Pink Ragged-robin wildflowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Lychnis flos-cuculi
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Partial shade
Mature Height:2 to 2.5 feet

Ragged-robin is a herbaceous perennial from the carnation family (Caryophyllaceae). It’s native to Britain, Europe, and Asia. They grow best in wetland habitats such as moist meadows and woodlands. Sadly, ragged-robin is in decline due to habitat loss.

Ragged-robin has basal rosettes that produce tall stems, delicate pink flowers, and five petals that are deeply divided with two slender lobes. Ragged-robin is an excellent wildflower for attracting pollinators.

36) Red Campion

Red Campion flowers in bloom
Scientific Name:Silene dioica
Flowering Season:Spring to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:2 to 3 feet

Red campions are some of Britain’s most common native wildflowers. They are native to Europe and prefer woodland habitats. However, red campions thrive in most habitats in Zones 5 to 8.

Red campions have upright stems bearing opposite pairs of oval-shaped leaves. The stems and leaves are hairy and slightly sticky, so red campions are also known as catchflies. Red campions have dark red or pink flowers, five deeply lobed petals, and white centers.

37) Scarlet Pimpernel

Orange Scarlet Pimpernel wildflowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Anagallis arvensis
Flowering Season:Summer to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:Up to 1 foot

Scarlet pimpernels are low-growing annual wildflowers from the primrose family. These British native flowers are also known as red chickweed or red pimpernel. Scarlet pimpernels were once widespread enough to be considered weeds but are now unfortunately in decline due to habitat loss.

Scarlet pimpernels have small, glossy oval-shaped leaves that have no stalks and also produce red star-shaped flowers with yellow stamens. The leaves also have spotted undersides.

38) Snake’s Head Fritillary

Snake's Head Fritillary flowers in bloom
Scientific Name:Fritillaria meleagris
Flowering Season:Spring
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:Up to 1 foot

Snake’s head fritillaries are some of Britain’s most iconic native wildflowers. These wildflowers have upright stems bearing one or two bell-shaped nodding flowers. These distinctive purple flowers have markings that resemble a checkerboard or snakeskin.

Snake’s head fritillaries grow best in wetlands and floodplains, and also grow in ancient hay meadows. Sadly, snake’s head fritillaries are in decline because of habitat loss and are today classed as Vulnerable in Great Britain.

39) Teasel

Teasel wildflowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Dipsacus fullonum
Flowering Season:Summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:4 to 6 feet

Teasels are common wildflowers native to Britain, Europe, Asia, and North Africa. These British native flowers are herbaceous biennials from the honeysuckle family (Caprifoliaceae). Teasels are adaptable plants that thrive in various habitats, including grasslands and woodlands.

Teasels have upright stems topped with cone-like flower heads. During the summer, a band of tiny lavender or purple flowers blooms in the center of the cone. Gradually, the entire cone blooms with these tiny flowers. After flowering, teasel seeds provide a vital winter food source for birds.

40) Viper’s Bugloss

Blue Viper's Bugloss flowers in bloom
Scientific Name:Echium vulgare
Flowering Season:Spring to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun
Mature Height:2 to 2.5 feet

Also known as blueweed, viper’s bugloss is a biennial or perennial wildflower native to Britain, Europe, and Asia. They are a member of the borage family (Boraginaceae). Viper’s bugloss grows best in areas with loose, poor soils, such as chalk grasslands and sand dunes.

Viper’s bugloss has upright hairy stems and oblong leaves. Each stalk forms a tall flower spike that is densely packed with small blue bell-shaped flowers. These flowers are rich in nectar and produce blue pollen.

41) White Campion

White Campion wildflowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Silene latifolia
Flowering Season:Spring to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:1 to 3 feet

White campions are biennial or perennial wildflowers from the carnation family. White campions are also known as catchfly due to their sticky, hairy stems. These British native flowers grow best in open habitats such as grasslands or woodland clearings.

White campions have upright stems that bear white flowers. These flowers have five petals with deeply divided lobes. White campions emit a pleasant scent at night to attract moths and other nocturnal pollinators.

42) Wild Columbine

Purple Wild Columbine wildflowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Aquilegia vulgaris
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:2 to 3 feet

Also known as European columbine, wild columbine is a herbaceous perennial that belongs to the buttercup family. They inhabit woodlands, meadows, and fens across Britain. Wild columbine has a short flowering season lasting from May until June.

Wild columbine produces hairy, branched stems. The leaves consist of three sets of smaller leaflets. These British native flowers also have blue, purple, or white nodding bell-shaped flowers with distinctive hooked spurs.

43) Wild Garlic

White Wild Garlic wildflowers in bloom
Scientific Name:Allium ursinum
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:1 to 1.5 feet

Also known as ramsons, wild garlic is a perennial wildflower from the Amaryllis family (Amaryllidaceae). Wild garlic is known for its edible leaves and thrives in shady woodland habitats, especially ancient woodlands.

Wild garlic grows from bulbs and produces long, bright green elliptical leaves. During spring and summer, wild garlic plants produce clusters of small white flowers with six slender petals. Each cluster can contain up to 20 individual flowers.

44) Wild Strawberry

Wild Strawberry wildflowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Fragaria vesca
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:Up to 1 foot

Wild strawberries are herbaceous perennials from the rose family. They grow in meadows, woodlands, and roadsides throughout the Northern Hemisphere. Wild strawberries are edible and were cultivated long before garden strawberries appeared.

These plants have thin stalks bearing a trio (trifoliate) of glossy, toothed leaves with hairs underneath. Each plant produces up to 11 white flowers with five rounded petals and yellow centers. Wild strawberries spread via runners.

45) Wild Thyme

Wild Thyme wildflowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Thymus polytrichus
Flowering Season:Summer to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun
Mature Height:Up to 2 inches

Wild thyme is a low-growing evergreen perennial from the mint or sage family (Lamiaceae). They thrive in chalk grasslands, meadows, and rocky areas across Britain and other parts of Europe. Also known as creeping thyme, wild thyme produces a beautiful fragrance during the summer.

Wild thyme produces mats of tiny oval-shaped leaves, which are arranged in pairs. They bloom from summer until fall and produce dense clusters of small pink or purple flowers.

46) Wood Anemone

White Wood Anemone flowers in bloom
Scientific Name:Anemonoides nemorosa
Flowering Season:Spring
Light Requirements:Partial to full shade
Mature Height:Up to 1 foot

Wood anemones are herbaceous perennials from the buttercup family (Ranunculaceae). They are native to shady woodlands in Britain and Europe. In Britain, wood anemones are a good indicator of ancient woodlands.

Wood anemones spread via rhizomes with palmate basal leaves divided into three lobes. During the spring, wood anemones produce short red stems bearing white flowers. Each flower has six or seven tepals surrounding yellow central stamens.

47) Wood Avens

Yellow Wood Avens in bloom
Scientific Name:Geum urbanum
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:1 to 1.5 feet

Also known as herb bennet, wood avens is a herbaceous perennial from the rose family. These wildflowers grow best in woodlands and hedgerows across Britain and temperate regions of Europe and Asia.

Wood avens produce pinnate compound leaves divided into three leaflets. These British native flowers have solitary bright yellow flowers with five petals and yellow stamens. After flowering, wood avens produce hooked, red seeds that attach themselves to passing animals.

48) Wood Sorrel

Pink Wood Sorrel flowers in bloom
Scientific Name:Oxalis acetosella
Flowering Season:Spring
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:2 to 4 inches

Wood sorrel is a low-growing perennial wildflower from the wood sorrel family (Oxalidaceae). It’s native to woodlands and hedgerows across Britain, Europe, and Asia. Wood sorrel is edible and has a sharp, sour taste similar to apples.

These British native flowers form low-growing mats of trefoil leaves arranged in three heart-shaped leaflets. At night, the leaves fold up into a tent and unfurl in the morning. In spring, wood sorrel has white bell-shaped leaves with five petals with purple veins.

49) Yellow Flag Iris

Yellow Flag Iris wildflowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Iris pseudacorus
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:1.5 to 3 feet

Yellow flag iris is a herbaceous perennial from the iris family (Iridaceae). These British native flowers have slender grayish-green sword-shaped leaves and tall stems similar to reeds. Yellow flag iris produces large yellow iris flowers with red veins.

Yellow flag iris is native to Britain, Europe, and parts of Asia and Africa. They thrive in wetlands, marshes, and along riverbanks. It also grows around woodland ponds and streams.

50) Yellow Rattle

Yellow Rattle wildflowers growing natively in Britain
Scientific Name:Rhinanthus minor
Flowering Season:Spring to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun
Mature Height:1 to 1.5 feet

Yellow rattle is a herbaceous annual wildflower from the broomrape family (Orobanchaceae). This hemiparasitic plant suppresses grasses in meadow habitats, allowing other wildflowers to grow. They are native to Britain, Europe, and parts of Asia and North America.

Yellow rattle produces tall stems with sessile leaves with serrated edges growing directly from the stem. These native British flowers also have tubular yellow flowers that emerge toward the top of each stem. The flowers are followed by silvery capsules containing seeds that rattle when shaken.

British Native Flowers & Wildflowers – Wrapping Up

Britain’s native wildflowers form a rich botanical heritage. Britain’s temperate climate corresponds to USDA Zones 6 to 9. Many of Britain’s native wildflowers thrive in open grasslands or shady woodlands. Some of the most common British wildflowers include buttercups, daisies, and forget-me-nots. Remember that it’s illegal to pick native flowers unless you’re on private land and have the landowner’s permission.

Contributing Editor | edd@petalrepublic.com | Full Bio

Edd is a budding content writer and gardener living in the United Kingdom. He has a bachelor's degree in Creative and Professional Writing and has written for several gardening publications online. He is passionate about nature and sustainability with a focus on gardening and wildlife.

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