Everything You Need to Know About Growing and Nurturing Watermelon Peperomia Plants at Home

This sweet little houseplant brightens any space with green and silver striped leaves coupled with vibrant red stems. Plus, the watermelon peperomia (Peperomia argyreia) is easy to care for, even if you don’t consider yourself a plant expert. It remains small even once it reaches maturity, so it’s a great addition to any desk or a small shelf. Although it’s sometimes referred to as a watermelon begonia and has waxy, succulent-like leaves, this plant is actually a type of radiator plant. To learn more about this trendy plant and how to care for one, read on.

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Watermelon Peperomia Care – The Essentials

Watermelon peperomia should receive at least five hours of indirect light but no bright light. They require medium humidity and temperatures between 60-80ºF. Choose a well-draining potting mix and water when the top one to two inches of soil is dry; every 1-3 weeks in summer and 3-5 weeks in winter.


About Watermelon Peperomia (Peperomia argyreia)

About Watermelon Peperomia (Peperomia argyreia)

No, this plant isn’t related to the sweet, juicy melon it’s named after. Rather, it’s a member of the Piperaceae family, the same family that peppercorn plants belong to.

The watermelon peperomia is part of the Peperomia genus known as radiator plants. Its species is argyreia.

Origins and History

Watermelon peperomia plants are native to the understory of tropical forests located in northern South America. They often grow on rotting wood or other materials located on the forest floor.

It’s unknown when these plants made it to other parts of the world, but they are currently enjoyed as houseplants by people throughout the world.


How to Grow Watermelon Peperomia Indoors at Home

How to Grow Watermelon Peperomia Indoors at Home

What to do Before Planting

Since these plants don’t take up a lot of room, you don’t need to worry about fitting them into your house. However, you’ll still need to find a proper location.

These plants like at least a few hours of indirect light, but the most important thing is that they don’t receive any bright, direct light. You don’t want the sun’s rays hitting the plant’s leaves.

Once you’ve found a suitable spot, pick out a pot that is the same size as the container your plant came in. These plants like being a bit rootbound, so don’t increase the size of your pot.

What’s the Best Soil Mix?

The Best Soil Mix for house plants

Watermelon peperomia plants prefer a soil mix that is well-draining yet capable of holding water and nutrients.

To make a potting soil that your watermelon peperomia will love, mix the following:

  • 1 part perlite
  • 1 part compost
  • 1 part peat moss or coco coir

Alternatively, you can look for a pre-mixed potting mix that is labeled as well-draining.

How to Plant Watermelon Peperomia

The watermelon peperomia is easy to plant, as long as you know a few details.

We’ve said it before, and we’ll say it again; these plants like being a bit rootbound. That means you shouldn’t choose a pot that is much bigger than your plant.

Once you’ve found a proper container, fill the bottom third with a well-draining potting mix, such as that described above. Place your plant into the pot, and top with potting mix.

 Water your plant with room temperature water and place it in a suitable location.

Light Preferences

Light Preferences

In nature, these plants reside in the understory, and their light requirements reflect this. They prefer at least five hours of light a day, yet they cannot withstand bright, direct light.

One of the best places for them is near any window that is covered with a curtain or shade that filters the light. You can also place your plant in the interior of a room, as long as it receives some light.

Temperature and Humidity Preferences

Watermelon peperomia do best at temperatures between 60-80ºF, although they can handle brief periods of temperatures below that range. They don’t do well with either hot or cold drafts, so keep them away from exterior doors and interior vents.

They don’t do well in dry air and prefer humidity levels above 50%. To raise the humidity levels in a dry house, spritz the plant with water every few days. Or you can place a tray filled with pebbles and water under the base of your plant’s pot.


How to Care for Watermelon Peperomia at Home

How to Care for Watermelon Peperomia at Home

Watering Watermelon Peperomia

With fleshy leaves that hold in moisture, these plants are more susceptible to overwatering than underwatering, but they can suffer from problems due to either. You want to prevent the soil from becoming completely dry, but also allow the soil to dry out in between waterings.

A good rule of thumb is to let the top inch or two of soil near the base of the plant dry out before watering. Various factors impact how long this will take, but you can expect to water every 1-3 weeks in the summer and every 3-5 weeks in the winter.

When you’re determining when to water, consider the following factors.

  • Light – The more light a plant receives, the faster its soil will dry.
  • Temperature – Higher temperatures lead to increased transpiration, which means you’ll need to water more frequently.
  • Humidity – The higher the humidity, the less you’ll need to water.
  • Growth – Plants slow their growth in winter and therefore use less water.

Fertilizing Watermelon Peperomia

These plants don’t have advanced nutrients needs, but they will benefit from a regular dose of houseplant fertilizer.

Dilute a standard indoor houseplant fertilizer to half of the recommended strength. Use this mixture to fertilize your plant every few months in late spring through early fall. You don’t need to fertilize during the winter.

Pruning Watermelon Peperomia

There’s no need to prune these little plants, but you can trim them whenever you feel like their growth is getting a little out of control. Use a sharp, clean pair of shears to cut the plant’s stems.

Propagating Watermelon Peperomia

Propagating Watermelon Peperomia

The two easiest ways to propagate watermelon peperomia at home are by division and by leaf or stem cuttings.

Propagate by Division

  1. Obtain a mature plant. You’ll need a plant that has at least a few clusters of leaves and established roots.
  2. Remove the soil. Carefully remove the entire plant from its container. Shake off the soil so you expose the roots.
  3. Separate the roots. Once you have a good view, separate the roots with a sharp knife or pair of shears. You want each piece to have at least one leaf as well as a root.
  4. Replant. Plant each of your divisions into an individual pot. Water in and care for as you would adult plants.

Propagate from a Stem Cutting

  1. Take a cutting. Obtain a cutting of leaf complete with at least one inch of the leaf’s red petiole (leaf stem).
  2. Place in water. Place the cutting in a container and add water so the base of the petiole is covered. The leaf shouldn’t be touching the water.
  3. Wait. Change the water weekly and wait for roots to appear.
  4. Pot. Once you see roots, you can plant the cutting in a pot filled with well-draining potting soil.

Propagate from a Leaf Cutting

  1. Obtain a cutting. Unlike a lot of other plants, these cuttings don’t need a leaf node for successful propagation. To obtain a cutting, make a clean cut perpendicular to the leaf’s stripes.
  2. Place in soil. Place the cutting in soil, cut side down. Only the very tip of the cutting should be under the soil.
  3. Cover and mist. Place a plastic bag or container over your cutting and mist with water to increase the humidity.
  4. Wait. Your cutting should develop roots within a few weeks. During this time, keep the humidity high, but avoid wet soil.

Repotting Watermelon Peperomia

Since these plants like being a bit rootbound, only repot them when they are way too big for their current container.


Common Problems and How to Treat Them

Common Problems and How to Treat Them

Dropping Leaves

If your plant is losing its leaves, this is likely due to one of two reasons.

The first reason is that you are overeating your plant. If the soil is constantly damp, decrease the frequency of your waterings.

Remember to allow the top one to inches of soil to dry out before watering. When you check for moisture, check near the middle of the pot, as the sides dry out quicker.

Another possible reason for leaf drop is cold temperatures. If your plant is in an area with air temperatures below 60ºF, move it to a warmer area.

Cold water can also shock your plant and cause it to lose leaves. Water your plant with room temperature water.

Rotting Tissue

If your watermelon peperomia’s leaves or stems are soft and mushy to the touch, they are rotting. The number one cause of root rot is overwatering.

Even if you aren’t watering very often, your plant may be suffering due to poor soil or an improperly draining container. Make sure you are using well-draining potting soil and a container with drainage holes.

If your plant is rotting, you may be able to revive it. Cut away any rotting tissue, repot your plant in fresh soil, and decrease the amount you water.

Yellowing Leaves

Guess what? Yellowing leaves are another sign that you are overwatering your plant or using a pot and/or potting soil without proper drainage.

Follow the advice listed above to fix this problem.


Essential Tools for Watermelon Peperomia

Essential House Plant Tools

One of the reasons these plants are so easy to care for is that they don’t require any special tools. All you’ll need a properly-sized pot with a drainage hole and the right environment.


Wrapping Up

As an easy-to-care-for plant with gorgeous foliage, the watermelon peperomia makes a great addition to any home. Give it well-draining soil, a bit of sun, and warm temperatures to keep it happy.


Watermelon Peperomia FAQ 

Are Watermelon Peperomia Plants Easy to Grow at Home?

Yes, these plants are easy to grow at home, as long as you provide the right conditions. They’re a great choice for people new to caring for plants as well as for those who have lots of other plants at home.

How Long Will Watermelon Peperomia Typically Live?

Watermelon peperomia plants can easily live for over five years with the proper care.

Are Watermelon Peperomia Toxic to Humans and/or Pets?

No. The watermelon peperomia is non-toxic to both humans and pets.

How Big Will Watermelon Peperomia Grow Indoors?

These plants max out at about a foot tall and a foot wide, so they won’t take up a ton of space in your home.

How Fast Will Watermelon Peperomia Grow Indoors?

These plants grow quite quickly, and they can reach their maximum size in a few years.


Petal Republic’s Expert Guides to Houseplants

For more, see our expert houseplant care guides for Monstera Plants, Indoor Palm Trees, Dracaena, Corn Plants, Snake Plants, ZZ Plants, Rubber Tree Plants, Bird of Paradise, Heartleaf Philodendrons, and more.


Author

I’ve long been fascinated with the world of flowers, plants, and floral design. I come from a family of horticulturists and growers and spent much of my childhood in amongst the fields of flowering blooms and greenhouses filled with tropical plants, cacti, and succulents from all over the world. Today, my passion has led me to further explore the world of horticulture, botany, and floristry and I'm always excited to meet and collaborate with fellow enthusiasts and professionals from across the globe.

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