Stunning Indoor Purple Plants to Transform Your Living Space

House plants add life, light, and warmth to interior design. If you’re looking to elevate the visual interest of your indoor plant collection, why not shift from pure-green to purple house plants? Whether you select plants that are washed in shades of purple, dappled with violet spots, or that bloom with vibrant amethyst-colored flowers, your design can’t go wrong when you choose a purple house plant.


Purple House Plants Meanings & Symbolism

When found in plants and flowers, the color purple generally represents royalty and tradition. Purple can also symbolize success and feelings of admiration.

Individual purple flowers and plants have also taken on their own symbolic meanings. For example, the purple lotus represents spirituality in Buddhist traditions, the purple violet represents prayer in Christianity, and the Chinese evergreen symbolizes good luck.


20 Best Purple House Plants to Grow at Home

Here you’ll find 20 of our favorite purple house plants that will thrive in a range of living environments. We’ve included a brief care guide for each so you can find the perfect pick for your own unique living environment. 

1. Prayer Plant (Maranta leuconeura)

Prayer Plant (Maranta leuconeura)

The prayer plant gets its common name from its diurnal rhythm that results in its leaves lying flat during the day and folding upright at night, as if in prayer for evening vespers. Its leaves feature striking markings and coloring, which vary based on the variety of plant.

GENERAL CARE:Not too difficult to grow as long as you meet its particular needs
SOIL:Moist, well-draining, neutral to acidic soil
LIGHT: Partial to full shade
TEMP & HUMIDITY:65°F to 85°F and average to high humidity
WATERING: Water with filtered water when the soil dries halfway
FEEDING: Provide half-strength, water-soluble fertilizer every 1 to 2 weeks from early spring through fall
GROWTH:Slow growing plant reaches about 1-foot tall and 1-foot wide
TOXICITY:Non-toxic

2. Wandering Jew (Tradescantia zebrina)

Wandering Jew (Tradescantia zebrina)

Also commonly called the inch plant or spiderwort, the wandering Jew features striped leaves with new growth in a deep-purple hue and older growth in deep green. It blooms with small, purple flowers. Since it grows in colonies, its outdoor varieties are often used as ground cover in outdoor gardens. Tradescantia zebrina is usually potted in hanging containers indoors.

GENERAL CARE:Low-maintenance
SOIL: Rich, well-draining, loamy soil
LIGHT: Bright, indirect sunlight
TEMP & HUMIDITY:50°F to 80°F and average humidity
WATERING:Moist, well-draining, neutral to acidic soil
FEEDING: Half-strength, water-soluble fertilizer once a month
GROWTH:Fast-growing reaches about 6 to 12 inches in height and up to 24 inches in length.
TOXICITY:Non-toxic

3. Rex Begonia (Begonia rex-cultorum)

Rex Begonia (Begonia rex-cultorum)

Sometimes called fancy-leaf begonias or painted-leaf begonias, Rex Begonia plants are widely recognized for their highly ornamental foliage which features interesting patterns of intertwining fuchsia, silver, eggplant, red, and deep green.

GENERAL CARE:Careful cultivation is essential to producing attractive foliage.
SOIL: Well-draining, porous potting mix
LIGHT: Full to partial shade
TEMP & HUMIDITY:Moderate humidity (about 50%) and temperatures between 60°F to 70°F
WATERING: Regular watering to maintain moist but never soggy soil
FEEDING: Half-strength, water-soluble fertilizer every two weeks
GROWTH:Reaches about 12 to 18-inches tall and wide
TOXICITY:Toxic to humans, dogs, and cats

4. Chinese Evergreens (Aglaonema)

Chinese Evergreens (Aglaonema)

Chinese evergreens are thought to bring luck and have been cultivated for centuries in Asia for this reason. They’re a lovely indoor plant with beautifully marked foliage and perennial blossoms in mature plants.

GENERAL CARE:Difficult to grow in especially arid environments
SOIL: Peaty, acidic, well-draining potting mix
LIGHT: Partial to full shade
TEMP & HUMIDITY:Temperatures above 65°F and high humidity. Mist frequently or add a humidifier.
WATERING: Prefers moist but not soggy soil. Wait for the soil to dry before watering (and draining) thoroughly.
FEEDING: Feed once in early spring and once in late summer with slow-release fertilizer pellets.
GROWTH:Slow-growing up to 2-feet tall and wide
TOXICITY:Toxic to people, dogs, and cats

5. Calatheas (Calathea)

Calatheas (Calathea)

Calathea is a genus containing dozens of species of leafy green plants. These plants are usually referred to as calatheas and sometimes they’re called prayer-plants, like their close cousins Maranta leuconeura. Calathea leaves resemble carved feathers with eye-catching angular markings and a pinnate shape.

GENERAL CARE:Easy to grow, low-maintenance
SOIL: Porous, well-draining soil
LIGHT: Medium to bright indirect sunlight
TEMP & HUMIDITY:65°F to 85°F and moderate to high humidity
WATERING: Water when the soil dries halfway (every 1 or 2 weeks)
FEEDING: Feed monthly in spring and summer only with a general-purpose fertilizer.
GROWTH:Slow to moderate growth. Reaches about 2 feet in height indoors.
TOXICITY:Non-toxic

6. Purple Shamrock (Oxalis triangularis)

Purple Shamrock (Oxalis triangularis)

Commonly called the false shamrock or purple shamrock, Oxalis triangularis is actually native to South America – not Ireland – although they are popularly sold around Saint Patrick’s Day. These purple house plants resemble their wood sorrel relatives with green foliage and white flowers, but the purple shamrock actually grows dark-purple foliage and white, pink, or lavender flowers.

GENERAL CARE:Low-maintenance, easy to grow
SOIL: Well-draining, loamy, sandy, acidic soil
LIGHT: Full to partial sunlight
TEMP & HUMIDITY:Moderate humidity and temperatures between 60°F and 75°F
WATERING: Prefers even moisture. Water when the top inch of soil is dry.
FEEDING: Fall, winter, and spring only fertilize with a slow-release fertilizer
GROWTH:Up to 1-foot tall and 2-feet wide
TOXICITY:Toxic to people, dogs, and cats

7. Cyclamen

Cyclamen

Native to the Mediterranean Basin, Cyclamen is a genus of 23 flowering plants. They have attractively dappled heart-shaped leaves that are green on the top and purple on the backside. Their shooting-star-shaped flowers blossom from fall through spring in lovely purple, pink, red, and white hues.

GENERAL CARE:Easy to care for and low-maintenance. Remember that cyclamens look dead when dormant.
SOIL: Loamy, well-draining, acidic soil
LIGHT: Partial sun or bright, indirect light
TEMP & HUMIDITY:High humidity. Nighttime temperatures between 40°F and 50°F. Daytime temperatures between 60°F and 75°F.
WATERING: Prefer even moisture. Water thoroughly and allow excess moisture to drain when the top inch of soil is dry.
FEEDING: Fall, winter, and spring only feed with half-strength, low-nitrogen fertilizer.
GROWTH:6 to 9-inches tall
TOXICITY:Toxic to people, dogs, and cats

8. Purple Vanda Orchid (Vanda)

Purple Vanda Orchid (Vanda)

Vanda is a genus of about 80 species of orchids that have stunning blossoms in just about all colors of the rainbow. Several species of vanda orchids – like Vanda coerulea, Vanda pachara, Vanda sansai blue, Vanda mokara, and Vanda Robert’s delight to name just a few – bloom with fragrant stalks of speckled flowers spanning violet and indigo hues which make them quite striking purple house plants to introduce at home.

GENERAL CARE:Fairly high-maintenance, but easy to grow in the right conditions.
SOIL: Neutral, well-draining, soilless bark or peat moss
LIGHT: Partial sun or bright, indirect sunlight
TEMP & HUMIDITY:High humidity (mist frequently) and temperatures between 65°F and 85°F
WATERING: High water needs. Water frequently, but always allow to drain completely.
FEEDING: Fertilize weekly in spring and summer and monthly in fall and winter with a balanced fertilizer.
GROWTH:Mature plants reach 1 to 3-feet tall
TOXICITY:Considered non-toxic, but be cautious with children and pets, as the toxicity profile of all cultivars and hybrids is unclear.

9. Persian Shield Plant (Strobilanthes dyeriana)

Persian Shield Plant (Strobilanthes dyeriana)

The Persian shield is an evergreen shrub native to Myanmar. It has lush, green foliage topped with pinwheels of metallic leaves in a shade of purple that resembles the color of a peacock’s feathers. In the right conditions, Persian shields also produce lavender-colored flowers, but blooming is rare for indoor plants.

GENERAL CARE:Low-maintenance
SOIL: Slightly acidic to neutral, rich, moist, well-draining soil
LIGHT: Partial shade
TEMP & HUMIDITY:Moderate to high humidity at temperatures above 60°F
WATERING: Water when the top inch of soil dries with filtered room-temperature/luke-warm water.
FEEDING: In rich soil feed only once in early spring and once half-way through summer with an all-purpose fertilizer
GROWTH:Mature plants reach about 3 to 4-feet tall.
TOXICITY:Non-toxic to people and pets. Sap can cause mild skin irritation.

10. Christmas Cactus (Schlumbergera)

Christmas Cactus (Schlumbergera)

Although classified as a cactus, Schlumbergera is a genus of plants that are native to the coastal mountains of Brazil. Like orchids, they grow from the bark of trees and in rocky outcroppings. They have interesting segments of pad-like “leaves” and blossom with stunningly intricate tubular flowers in a variety of colors including a purplish fuchsia.

GENERAL CARE:Easy to grow, low-maintenance
SOIL: Neutral to acidic, moist, well-draining soil
LIGHT: Partial sun or bright, filtered light
TEMP & HUMIDITY:High humidity and temperatures from 60°F to 80°F
WATERING: When soil is almost dry, water thoroughly and allow excess moisture to drain.
FEEDING: Feed monthly with a half-strength, water-soluble fertilizer until buds form. Resume monthly fertilizer once blossoms emerge.
GROWTH:Reaches up to 1-foot tall and 2-feet wide
TOXICITY:Non-toxic to people and pets

11. Purple Succulents (Echeveria)

Purple Succulents (Echeveria)

Echeveria is a genus of about 150 species of rosette-shaped succulents that are native to Mexico, Central America, and Northwestern South America. Depending on the specific species, echeveria plants vary in color, leaf shape, size, and texture, but they’re all equally beautiful and fun to collect. Purple varieties like the Purple Pearl, Afterglow, Dark Moon, and Dark Prince echeverias range from a dusty lavender hue to a dark, almost-black purple.

GENERAL CARE:Low-maintenance, easy to grow
SOIL: Well-draining, neutral soil (standard cactus and succulent potting mix works well)
LIGHT: Full sun (bright, direct light)
TEMP & HUMIDITY:Low humidity and warm temperatures are ideal. Will thrive in the average household, but won’t survive steamy bathrooms.
WATERING: Low water needs. Only water when the soil has dried completely and allow all excess moisture to drain.
FEEDING: Adapted to nutrient-poor soil. Be careful not to over-feed. Only offer a cactus/succulent fertilizer once a year in spring or summer.
GROWTH:Size varies with species. Some remain low to the ground and just a few inches across, while other species grow on tall stalks and become quite large.
TOXICITY:Non-toxic to pets and people

12. Gloxinia

Gloxinia

Gloxinia is a genus of just three original species and several hybrids of flowering plants that are native to regions of South America including the Andes, the West Indies, and parts of Central America. This tropical herbaceous plant has lush, green, spade-shaped foliage and delicate bell-shaped blossoms in shades of lavender and violet. With velvety foliage and showy blooms, gloxinia hybrids are often mistaken for African Violets.

GENERAL CARE:Low-maintenance and easy to grow in the right conditions
SOIL: Loos, slightly acidic, well-draining soil (African violet or gardenia potting mix works well)
LIGHT: Bright, indirect light
TEMP & HUMIDITY:Moderate to high humidity and temperatures between 70°F to 80°F
WATERING:Soil should always be moist but never soggy. Self-watering containers are ideal.
FEEDING: Fertilize monthly during the growing season with a water-soluble fertilizer.
GROWTH:mature plants reach 6 to 12-inches tall
TOXICITY:Non-toxic to pets and people

13. Rubber Tree Plant (Ficus elastica)

Rubber Tree Plant (Ficus elastica)

The rubber tree plant is actually a type of ficus tree that can grow up to 200-feet tall in its native habitat, but don’t worry – your rubber tree won’t grow that big when potted indoors. Rubber tree plants have attractive, oval-shaped leaves that fan out in a neat pattern up the plant’s central trunk. The leaves are a lush-green color that takes on a purplish hue when viewed from below.

GENERAL CARE:Easy to care for and low-maintenance
SOIL: Acidic, well-draining soil
LIGHT: Filtered sunlight or partial shade
TEMP & HUMIDITY:Moderate to high humidity and temperatures between 60°F and 75°F
WATERING: Prefer even moisture. Water thoroughly when the top inch of soil is dry and allow excess moisture to drain completely.
FEEDING: Fertilize lightly during the growing season with a half or quarter-strength liquid fertilizer
GROWTH:Indoors rubber trees can reach up to 10-feet tall. Control growth with limited container size and light feeding.
TOXICITY:Toxic to dogs and cats. Can cause skin irritation in people.

14. Moses-in-the-Cradle (Tradescantia spathacea)

Moses-in-the-Cradle (Tradescantia spathacea)

The Moses-in-the-Cradle (also called the boat lily) is a plant that features a rosette of lance-shaped leaves that are green and white striped on the top-side and flash with a vibrant purple on the back. They bloom with clusters of small pink or white flowers. While they grow wildly outdoors in warmer climates and have become an invasive species in Florida and Louisiana, they’re quite popularly cultivated indoors as houseplants.

GENERAL CARE:Easy, low-maintenance
SOIL: Porous, well-draining soil
LIGHT: Bright, direct light
TEMP & HUMIDITY:60°F to 85°F and high humidity
WATERING: Prefers even moisture. Water when the top inch or two of soil dries. Reduce watering frequency during the winter.
FEEDING: Spring and summer only feed a well-balanced, half-strength fertilizer monthly
GROWTH:Reaches about 1 to 2 feet in height and a similar diameter
TOXICITY:Toxic to people and pets

15. African Violet (Streptocarpus sect. Saintpaulia)

African Violet (Streptocarpus sect. Saintpaulia)

Native to the tropical climates of Eastern Africa, African violets have a reputation for being difficult to grow. In the right conditions, however, these plants will thrive and bloom on and off throughout the year. These plants feature a variety of lush leaves that grow in shades of green and purple and blossoms that bloom in a variety of colors and variegations, including several in different shades of purple. Once you get the hang of growing African violets, you’ll never want to stop.

GENERAL CARE:Moderate difficulty but easy to grow in the right conditions
SOIL:Slightly acidic, almost neutral pH potting mix that is porous and well-draining (African violet potting mix is recommended)
LIGHT: Bright, indirect sunlight
TEMP & HUMIDITY:High humidity and an average temperature of 70°F
WATERING: Prefers constant, even moisture soil but never soggy soil. Self-watering containers are best for achieving proper moisture and humidity and avoiding moisture-related leaf damage.
FEEDING: Every other week, feed a fertilizer formulated specifically for African violets.
GROWTH:Low-growing and compact. Mature plants reach 8 to 16-inches across
TOXICITY:Non-toxic to pets and people

16. Ti Plant (Cordyline fruticosa)

Ti Plant (Cordyline fruticosa)

Commonly called the ti plant, Hawaiian ti plant, cabbage palm, or palm lily, the Cardyline fruticosa is native to many islands of the South Pacific, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, and Southeast Asia. It’s believed to bring good luck. Plus, it’s grown for religious and medicinal purposes, and it’s beloved around the world as a houseplant for its attractive, ornamental leaves. The ti plant’s sword-shaped leaves sprout upward along a central stalk and stun in vibrant shades that range from fuchsia to a deep purplish-red. It blossoms in shades of lavender, pink, and white.

GENERAL CARE:Low-maintenance
SOIL: Slightly acidic, loamy/sandy, well-draining potting mix
LIGHT: Full to partial, filtered sunlight
TEMP & HUMIDITY:High humidity and temperatures between 65°F and 95°F
WATERING: Water regularly with tepid filtered water during the growing season to maintain continuously moist soil. Avoid splashing the leaves. Reduce frequency during fall and winter.
FEEDING: Feed a slow-release, balanced fertilizer during the growing season.
GROWTH:Mature plants reach up to 10-feet tall and 3 to 4-feet across.
TOXICITY:Toxic to pets

17. Purple Passion (Gynura aurantiaca)

Purple Passion (Gynura aurantiaca)

Commonly called the purple passion or velvet plant, Gynura aurantiaca is a flowering plant that belongs to the daisy family. It’s most noted for its deep-green leaves that are dusted with a coat of bright-purple fuzz. It features vibrant orange-yellow blossoms and grows wild in Southeast Asia. The plant is easy to cultivate indoors in any climate. Best displayed in a hanging basket, purple passion’s long velvety leaves will hang over the edge.

GENERAL CARE:Easy, low-maintenance
SOIL: Well-draining, nutrient-rich soil
LIGHT: Bright, indirect/filtered sunlight to partial shade (more sunlight creates more vibrant leaves)
TEMP & HUMIDITY:Moderate humidity and temperatures from 60°F to 70°F
WATERING: Maintain even moisture by watering regularly during the growing season and reducing frequency during fall and winter.
FEEDING:Spring and summer fertilize weekly with a balanced, half-strength, water-soluble fertilizer.
GROWTH:1 to 2-feet tall
TOXICITY:Non-toxic to people and pets

18. Aechmea ‘Blue Rain’ Bromeliad (Aechmea)

Aechmea 'Blue Rain' Bromeliad (Aechmea)

Aechmea is a genus of flower plants that belongs to the bromeliad family and contains about 250 species of flowering tropical plants. Bromeliads are epiphytes, which means they grow from trees rather than in soil in the ground. However, they can still be cultivated indoors with the right potting mix. All bromeliads have exotic looks and tropical colors. Specifically, the Aechmea ‘Blue Rain’ Bromeliad is a hybrid that features a strikingly beautiful central blossoming spike of fiery red and vibrant violet blossoms. A great ornamental purple house plant.

GENERAL CARE:Easy to grow in favorable conditions
SOIL: Well-draining, low-moisture potting mix
LIGHT: Bright, indirect/filtered sunlight
TEMP & HUMIDITY:High humidity and temperatures between 65°F to 80°F
WATERING:Pour tepid water through the plant’s central crown. Keep soil constantly moist, but never soggy.
FEEDING: During the growing season, feed monthly with a half-strength, balanced, liquid fertilizer.
GROWTH:Can reach up to about 15 inches high
TOXICITY:Non-toxic to pets and people

19. Bellflower (Campanula)

Bellflower (Campanula)

Campanula (Latin for “little bell”) is a genus of flowering plants named for the classic bell-like shape of its purplish-blue blossoms. This genus contains more than 500 species and even more subspecies and hybrid cultivars of bellflowers. Outdoors, it’s commonly cultivated for a vibrant, naturally spreading ground cover. However, it’s also quite lovely planted in containers and can be successfully grown indoors.

GENERAL CARE:Easy to grow in the right conditions
SOIL: Average, well-draining soil with a pH ranging from 6 to 8
LIGHT: Full sun to partial shade
TEMP & HUMIDITY:Temperatures between 65°F and 70°F and high humidity
WATERING: Maintain an evenly moist soil with complete drainage by watering when the top inch or two dries out.
FEEDING: Fertilize once in early spring with a well-balanced fertilizer
GROWTH:Mature plants grow to be about 6-inches tall and 8-inches across
TOXICITY:Non-toxic to people or pets

20. Pink Quill (Wallisia cyanea)

Pink Quill (Wallisia cyanea)

The Wallisia cyanea is a species of plant that belongs to the bromeliad family. It’s commonly named pink quill in tribute to its stunning, light-pink, quill or feather-shaped bracts that blossom with violet flowers. These unusual purple house plants will make an interesting addition to any indoor gardenscape or as an individual living decor accent.

GENERAL CARE:Low-maintenance
SOIL: Loose potting soil mixed with bark (orchid mixes or bromeliad mixes are suitable)
LIGHT: Filtered sunlight to partial shade
TEMP & HUMIDITY:Moderate humidity and temperatures ranging from 65°F to 75°F
WATERING: Keep soil constantly moist. Do not let it dry out between waterings, but do not allow the plant to sit in standing water.
FEEDING: Fertilize once in early spring with a well-balanced fertilizer
GROWTH:Reaches up to 12-inches tall
TOXICITY:Non-toxic for people and pets

Choose Your Purple Houseplants with Care

When there are so many purple plants to choose from, it can be difficult to narrow down your search. Remember that it’s always best to pick plants that require a level of care you’re comfortable providing and a preferred environment that your home or office can easily provide.


Purple House Plants FAQ

What plants have purple leaves?

There are numerous plants that showcase an array of vibrant purple colors in their foliage. Some of our favorite purple plants include Campanula, Ti plants, Calatheas, Prayer Plants, Purple African Violets, dark burgundy and purple Rubber Tree Plants, Moses-in-the-cradle, Gloxinia, any many types of succulents.

What is the meaning and symbolism of purple plants?

Traditionally, the color purple represents royalty and regality. Purple can also symbolize success and feelings of admiration. Individual purple plants and flowers have also taken on their own symbolic meanings across cultures and religions around the world. For example, the purple lotus represents spirituality in Buddhist traditions, the purple violet represents prayer in Christianity, and the Chinese evergreen symbolizes good luck.

What causes purple leaves?

Purple leaves most commonly occur due to a pigment known as anthocyanin. This pigment absorbs both yellow and green light into the cell structure of the foliage causing various shades of the color purple to occur.

Why are my plant leaves turning purple?

Plants that don’t inherently produce purple foliage but appear to be turning shades of purple (from their natural green typically) might be suffering from a phosphorus deficiency. This typically occurs when the plant is lacking in vital nutrients or is exposed to or experiencing environmental shock such as exposure to sudden cold temperatures.


Author

I’ve long been fascinated with the world of flowers, plants, and floral design. I come from a family of horticulturists and growers and spent much of my childhood in amongst the fields of flowering blooms and greenhouses filled with tropical plants, cacti, and succulents from all over the world. Today, my passion has led me to further explore the world of horticulture, botany, and floristry and I'm always excited to meet and collaborate with fellow enthusiasts and professionals from across the globe. I hold a BSc degree in Plant Sciences and have trained professionally at leading floristry schools in London and Paris.

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