Southern Blooms: Exploring 25 Native Georgia Flowers & Plants

Georgia has a beautiful bounty of native flowers and plants. The Peach State is home to stunning flowers such as cardinal flowers, flame azaleas, and Southern magnolias. In this article, I’ll explore 25 of my favorite flowers and plants native to Georgia.

Native Georgia Flowers and Plants

Georgia Native Range & Growing Zones

According to the USDA Hardiness Zone map, Georgia occupies Zones 6b to 8b. Most of Georgia experiences humid subtropical conditions with relatively warm temperatures and moderate to high humidity. Georgia’s habitats include mountain slopes, rolling hills, and coastal plains.

How Are Georgia’s Native Flowers Defined?

Georgia’s native flowers have grown without human intervention for thousands of years. However, humans have also introduced several non-native species to Georgia. Some non-native species have become invasive, threatening Georgia’s native plants.

25 Flowers & Plants Native to Georgia:

1) American Beautyberry

American Beautyberry in bloom showcasing bright purple berries and deep green foliage

As its name suggests, the American beautyberry is named for its gorgeous purple berries. These berries emerge in dense clusters between the leaves during fall and winter. These deciduous shrubs also have elliptical or ovate leaves with serrated margins.

These native Georgia shrubs also have small pink, purple, or white flowers. These shrubs thrive in moist, well-draining soils in Zones 6 to 11.

Scientific Name:Callicarpa americana
Growing Zones:6 to 11
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:6 feet

2) Black-eyed Susan

A field of yellow Black-eyed Susan are beautiful types of native Georgia flowers

Black-eyed Susan flowers are some of my favorite American wildflowers. These charming annuals or short-lived perennials have bright yellow petals and dark brown central florets. Black-eyed Susan flowers also have coarse, hairy oval-shaped leaves.

I love growing these drought-tolerant wildflowers in containers or wildflower borders. Black-eyed Susan flowers symbolize justice, motivation, and positive changes. They grow best in full sun.

Scientific Name:Rudbeckia hirta
Growing Zones:3 to 9
Flowering Season:Summer to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun
Mature Height:3 feet

3) Bloodroot

Bright white Bloodroot flowers in bloom

Bloodroot flowers are herbaceous perennials from the poppy family (Papaveraceae). When cut, bloodroot plants produce a poisonous red sap, hence their common name. Bloodroot plants grow best in shady garden beds and borders.

During the spring, bloodroot plants have large white flowers with yellow stamens. Each flower only lasts for a few days. Bloodroot plants also have bluish-green rounded leaves with deep clefts.

Scientific Name:Sanguinaria canadensis
Growing Zones:3 to 8
Flowering Season:Spring
Light Requirements:Partial to full shade
Mature Height:10 inches

4) Cardinal Flower

Deep red Cardinal Flower in bloom

With their bright red flowers, cardinal flowers are perfect for summer borders and wildflower beds. These stunning flowers have two upper petals and three lower petals. Cardinal flowers also grow in clumps of dark green lance-shaped leaves.

These Georgia native flowers grow best in fertile, moist soils, but they can also thrive in dense, wet soils with poor drainage.

Scientific Name:Lobelia cardinalis
Growing Zones:3 to 9
Flowering Season:Summer to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:4 feet

5) Coral Honeysuckle

Pink and white flowering Coral Honeysuckle

Also known as scarlet honeysuckle, coral honeysuckle vines are excellent climbing plants for arbors and trellises. Coral honeysuckle vines can grow up to 20 feet long and thrive in full sun or partial shade.

Coral honeysuckle vines have papery brownish-orange bark and smooth, ovate leaves. These vines produce clusters of bright red trumpet-shaped flowers followed by red inedible berries.

Scientific Name:Lonicera sempervirens
Growing Zones:4 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun or partial shade
Mature Height:20 feet

6) Crossvine

The orange and red trumpet-shaped flowers of the native Georgian Crossvine plant

Crossvines are stunning woody vines with tendrils that climb nearby plants or structures. They perform best when allowed to climb trellises, arbors, and walls.

These Georgia vines have dark green leaves that turn reddish-purple during the winter. When cut, the stems show a cross pattern. Crossvines also produce masses of reddish-orange trumpet-shaped flowers with a strong mocha-like fragrance.

Scientific Name:Bignonia capreolata
Growing Zones:6 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:50 feet

7) Dogwood

Flowering Dogwood showcasing white blooms and green leaves

I love dogwood trees because they provide seasonal interest throughout the year. These popular ornamental trees work best as centerpieces for garden borders. Dogwood trees grow best in moist, fertile, well-draining soils.

During the spring, dogwood trees are covered in gorgeous white or pink flowers. Dogwoods also have grayish-brown bark and oval-shaped leaves that turn reddish-brown or reddish-purple during the fall.

Scientific Name:Cornus florida
Growing Zones:5 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:15 to 30 feet

8) Eastern Redbud

Lush pink clusters of pink flowers on the Eastern Redbud shrubs

Eastern redbuds are gorgeous ornamental shrubs from the legume or pea family (Fabaceae). These deciduous shrubs have cordate or heart-shaped leaves and dark, smooth bark. During the spring, these redbuds are covered with clusters of light or dark pink pea-like flowers.

Eastern redbuds are low-maintenance shrubs that work best in ornamental shrub borders. These shrubs are fairly drought-tolerant and thrive in well-draining soils.

Scientific Name:Cercis canadensis
Growing Zones:4 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:30 feet

9) Flame Azalea

Golden orange flowers from the native Georgia Flame Azalea plant

Flame azaleas are some of Georgia’s most spectacular native flowers. During spring and summer, these deciduous shrubs erupt with clusters of large trumpet-shaped yellow to red flowers. Flame azaleas also have hairy, oval-shaped leaves that turn red or yellow in the fall.

These colorful azaleas make excellent hedges but also work well in shrub borders. Flame azaleas thrive in moist, well-draining soils.

Scientific Name:Rhododendron calendulaceum
Growing Zones:5 to 8
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:8 feet

10) Foam Flower

A collection of white and pink blooming Foam Flowers in a wooded area in Georgia

Foam flowers are attractive herbaceous perennials from the Saxifragaceae family. These colorful wildflowers are ideal for shady garden borders or wildflower gardens. Foam flowers thrive in cool, shady conditions in Zones 3 to 8.

I love foam flowers because they have long, beautiful spikes of star-shaped pink or white flowers. These perennials also have glossy evergreen heart-shaped leaves that turn reddish-brown in the fall.

Scientific Name:Tiarella cordifolia
Growing Zones:3 to 8
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Partial to full shade
Mature Height:Approximately 1 foot

11) Georgia Aster

A cluster of vibrant purple Georgia Aster flowers in bloom

Georgia asters are stunning flowers that add a pop of color to wildflower gardens and containers during the fall. These herbaceous perennials have thick, hairy, lance-shaped leaves and woody stems. Georgia asters have dark purple flowers with white central florets.

These asters inhabit oak-pine forests across the Southeastern United States. Georgia asters are somewhat drought-tolerant and thrive in well-draining sandy soils.

Scientific Name:Symphyotrichum georgianum
Growing Zones:3 to 9
Flowering Season:Fall
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:3 feet

12) Indian Pink

A close shot of a yellow and red Indian Pink flower in bloom

Indian pinks are attractive herbaceous perennials that are ideal for shady gardens. These plants form clumps of glossy lance-shaped leaves. During the summer, Indian pinks have clusters of tubular red flowers with five yellow recurved lobes at the tips.

Indian pinks thrive in moist, fertile, well-draining soils but can tolerate dry spells. These perennials thrive in woodland wildflower beds.

Scientific Name:Spigelia marilandica
Growing Zones:5 to 9
Flowering Season:Summer
Light Requirements:Partial to full shade
Mature Height:2 feet

13) Joe-Pye Weed

A cluster of pink Joe-Pye Weed with whorls of lance-shaped green leaves

With a long blooming season and nectar-rich flowers, Joe-Pye weed is perfect for pollinators or wildlife gardens. These herbaceous perennials grow best in fertile, well-draining soils.

These native Georgia flowers form clumps of hollow, upright stems with whorls of lance-shaped leaves. Joe-Pye weed also has dense clusters of tiny pinkish-purple flowers. The flowers also produce a delicate vanilla fragrance.

Scientific Name:Eutrochium fistulosum
Growing Zones:4 to 10
Flowering Season:Summer to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun or partial shade
Mature Height:7 feet

14) Loblolly Pine

Loblolly pines showcasing scaly, furrowed gray bark and dark green needle-like leaves.

Loblolly pines are towering, fast-growing pines that are typically grown as lumber trees. They thrive in warm, humid conditions and moist, acidic soils.

Loblolly pines have scaly, furrowed gray bark and dark green needle-like leaves. The leaves give off a slightly resinous scent. During the spring, loblolly pines also have inconspicuous yellowish-brown flowers.

Scientific Name:Pinus taeda
Growing Zones:6 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring
Light Requirements:Full sun
Mature Height:80 to 115 feet

15) Mountain Laurel

Mountain laurels plant with dense clusters of hexagonal bell-shaped pink flowers.

Also known as calico bushes, mountain laurel shrubs are popular as ornamental landscaping shrubs. These evergreen shrubs form thickets of leathery, oval-shaped dark green leaves. Mountain laurels also have dense clusters of hexagonal bell-shaped pink or white flowers.

Mountain laurels grow best in shady garden borders or woodland areas—these shrubs like moist, acidic soils that still provide good drainage.

Scientific Name:Kalmia latifolia
Growing Zones:4 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring to summer
Light Requirements:Partial shade
Mature Height:20 feet

16) Partridge Berry

A Georgia Partridge Berry plant with bright red berries and deep green leaves.

Partridge berry plants are low-growing woody shrubs from the coffee family (Rubiaceae). They make fantastic evergreen ground covers, especially in shady gardens. The shrubs produce tasteless but edible red berries.

These low-growing vines have glossy dark green cordate to ovate leaves. Partridge berry shrubs also have pairs of small white flowers that can bloom from spring until fall.

Scientific Name:Mitchella repens
Growing Zones:3 to 9
Flowering Season:Spring to fall
Light Requirements:Partial to full shade
Mature Height:Approximately 2 inches

17) Southern Magnolia

A close-up of a Southern Magnolia with creamy-white flowers with thick, waxy green petals.

Few of Georgia’s native flowers have as much impact as Southern magnolias. From summer until fall, these beautiful trees produce large, creamy-white flowers with thick, waxy petals. These magnolias also have glossy dark green elliptical leaves.

I love using Southern magnolia trees as impressive but low-maintenance garden centerpieces. The incredible flowers also emit a wonderful scent similar to citronella or lemon.

Scientific Name:Magnolia grandiflora
Growing Zones:7 to 10
Flowering Season:Summer to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:60 to 120 feet

18) Swamp Sunflower

Swamp Sunflower showcasing bright yellow flowers with dark brown central florets.

Also known as narrowleaf sunflowers, swamp sunflowers are fantastic flowers to grow around garden ponds. These salt-tolerant sunflowers also thrive in coastal areas. Swamp sunflowers grow best in full sun and need moist to wet, well-draining soils.

Swamp sunflowers have upright greenish-purple stems and form clumps of narrow, hairy leaves. During the fall, these sunflowers produce several bright yellow flowers with dark brown central florets.

Scientific Name:Helianthus angustifolius
Growing Zones:5 to 10
Flowering Season:Fall
Light Requirements:Full sun
Mature Height:4 feet

19) Trumpet Creeper

Trumpet Creeper in bloom with large, yellow-orange trumpet-shaped flowers.

Trumpet creepers are colorful and vigorous woody vines that can grow as climbers or ground cover plants. These deciduous vines grow best when climbing arbors, trellises, and other structures.

Trumpet creepers latch onto nearby supports using their aerial roots. These vines have compound pinnate leaves divided into several ovate leaflets. During the summer, they also produce large, reddish-orange trumpet-shaped flowers.

Scientific Name:Campsis radicans
Growing Zones:5 to 9
Flowering Season:Summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:40 feet

20) Turk’s Cap Lily

Turk's Cap Lily are beautiful types of native Georgia flowers showcasing reflexed orange petals covered with reddish-purple spots.

Turk’s cap lilies are some of my favorite Georgia wildflowers, thanks to their spectacular blooms. These nodding flowers face downwards and have reflexed orange petals covered with reddish-purple spots. These lilies also have whorls of green lance-shaped leaves.

These stunning herbaceous perennials are ideal for garden borders. Planting the bulbs in groups helps maximize their impact. Turk’s cap lilies need fertile, moist, well-draining soils.

Scientific Name:Lilium superbum
Growing Zones:4 to 7
Flowering Season:Summer
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:9 feet

21) Virginia Bluebells

Virginia Bluebells are beautiful native woodland Georgia wildflowers with clusters of violet colored flowers.

I love seeing drifts of Virginia bluebells spring up in shady wildflower borders or woodland areas. Virginia bluebells have arching stems and large grayish-green ovate leaves. During the spring, these woodland wildflowers have clusters of bell-shaped bluish-purple flowers.

Virginia bluebells grow best in moist, well-draining soils that contain plenty of nutrients. These herbaceous perennials struggle if the soil gets too dry.

Scientific Name:Mertensia virginica
Growing Zones:3 to 8
Flowering Season:Spring
Light Requirements:Partial to full shade
Mature Height:2 feet

22) Wild Blue Phlox

Soft blue flowers of the Wild Blue Phlox in bloom

If you want to add fragrance and color to your garden, wild blue phlox is the perfect flower for you. These low-growing woodland wildflowers form mats of scented blue, pink, or purple flowers. Wild blue phlox is an excellent ground cover plant for shady borders.

Wild blue phlox blooms during the spring. These herbaceous perennials also have hairy lanceolate to ovate evergreen leaves.

Scientific Name:Phlox divaricata
Growing Zones:3 to 8
Flowering Season:Spring
Light Requirements:Partial shade
Mature Height:Approximately 1 foot

23) Witch Hazel

Witch Hazel plants in bloom with green oval-shaped leaves and yellowish-green flowers with narrow petals

Witch hazel is a deciduous shrub or small tree that works well in woodland areas or shrub borders. These low-maintenance shrubs thrive in rich, well-draining, acidic soils that stay slightly moist.

Witch hazel shrubs have smooth grayish-brown bark and crooked branches. These shrubs also have green oval-shaped leaves and yellowish-green flowers with narrow petals. The flowers produce a lovely, sweet fragrance.

Scientific Name:Hamamelis virginiana
Growing Zones:3 to 8
Flowering Season:Fall to winter
Light Requirements:Full sun to full shade
Mature Height:20 to 30 feet

24) Woodland Spider Lily

Woodland Spider Lily showcasing large white flowers with fused inner petals and five slender outer petals

Woodland spider lilies are unusual but attractive plants that actually belong to the amaryllis family (Amaryllidaceae). These bulbous perennials have large white flowers with fused inner petals and five slender outer petals. These flowers also have a sweet scent.

Woodland spider lilies grow in clumps of long, lanceolate leaves. These spider lilies grow best in moist or wet soils, making them ideal for bog gardens and ponds.

Scientific Name:Hymenocallis occidentalis
Growing Zones:5 to 8
Flowering Season:Summer to fall
Light Requirements:Full sun or partial shade
Mature Height:2 feet

25) Yellow Jessamine

Bright yellow trumpet-shaped flowers of the Yellow Jessamine

Yellow jessamine is a gorgeous evergreen vine that is best grown as a climber. These perennials thrive when trained to climb arbors and trellises. However, they do require fertile, moist, well-draining soils that contain lots of organic matter.

Yellow jessamine vines have glossy, ovate leaves that can turn slightly yellow or purple during the winter. From late winter until spring, these vines have stunning bright yellow trumpet-shaped flowers. These wonderful flowers emit a sweet fragrance.

Scientific Name:Gelsemium sempervirens
Growing Zones:7 to 10
Flowering Season:Winter to spring
Light Requirements:Full sun to partial shade
Mature Height:20 feet

Georgia Native Flowers & Plants FAQs:

What Flower is Native to Georgia?

Several of America’s most iconic wildflowers, including black-eyed Susan and wild blue phlox, are native to Georgia. Flowering trees such as eastern redbuds and Southern magnolias are also native to the Peach State.

What is Georgia’s State Flower?

Georgia’s state wildflower is the azalea, of which several species are native to the state. One of the most beautiful is the flame azalea (Rhododendron calendulaceum).

Can You Pick Wildflowers in Georgia?

Picking wildflowers from public lands in Georgia, such as state parks, is illegal. It’s also illegal to pick rare or endangered wildflowers. However, you can pick wildflowers on private land with the landowner’s permission.

Wrapping Up

Georgia’s native flowers and plants range from iconic wildflowers like black-eyed Susans to flowering trees like Southern magnolias. Some of my personal favorites include flame azaleas, Georgia asters, and Turk’s cap lilies. Georgia’s native plants thrive in USDA Zones 6b to 8b.


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