What Color Do Marigolds Come In?

Marigolds come in a wide range of bright and cream colors that provide an option for every kind of gardener. Follow this guide to find out about what color marigolds come in and the best options for your garden or next floral arrangement. 

What Color Do Marigolds Come In

Key Takeaways

Marigolds (Tagetes) come in many fiery colors. Orange is the most common, but there are also red, bright yellow, cream-yellow, and almost white varieties. Bicolor options are also popular, with many cultivars featuring red, yellow, orange, and yellow petals and contrasting centers.

Marigold Colors:Popular Varietals:
YellowDurango Yellow, Discovery Yellow, Antigua Yellow
OrangeDurango Orange, Bonanza Orange, Inca II Orange
GoldBonanza Gold, Gold Coin Series, Jubilee Gold
RedDurango Red, Super Hero Red
BicolorQueen Sophia (Gold and Red), Harlequin (Red and Gold), Taishan Gold (Gold with Orange)

Marigold Color Varieties:

Orange

Orange

When you think of marigolds, orange is undoubtedly the first color to come to mind. Whether they display the delicate thin petals of the Signet marigold or the dense pom-poms of the African marigold, orange is an irresistible color.

French marigold fans will appreciate the bright blooms of Hero Orange. This marigold remains short and compact, sporting large double flowers in bright and captivating orange. It has also won the Royal Horticultural Society’s Award of Garden Merit.

Discovery Orange is another popular orange type, an African marigold with dense foliage and flowers. They are great in containers, producing masses of color from summer through to fall.

Bright Yellow

Bright Yellow

If you’re looking for a summer flower that emulates the season’s sunshine, bright yellow marigolds are ideal. Some varieties produce blinding, almost luminous yellow petals that are guaranteed to stand out in your flower beds or amongst your veggies.

Evident in the name, Zenith Lemon Yellow fits this color category perfectly. A type of Triploid marigold (Tagetes patula x erecta), this plant flowers prolifically and doesn’t set seed at the end of the season.

If you prefer single flowers that bloom en masse, try the Signet variety Lemon Gem. It grows to about a foot high and becomes a sea of bright yellow in summer – an excellent choice for borders.

Creamy Yellow

Creamy Yellow

Bright yellow is not all this genus of plants has to offer. More muted tones of pastel or creamy yellow are also available, adding a soft touch to cottage gardens and cut marigold flower arrangements. Try pairing them with some of the lighter orange varieties for a gentle summery display.

Tagetes erecta’ Sweet Cream‘ is the perfect example of what this color group has to offer. The flowers are rounded with dense petals in a light yellow, ideal for flower arranging. They grow just over a foot tall with masses of stunning blooms that will continue to flower with regular deadheading.

A type that may be harder to find but is well worth the extra detective work is Kilimanjaro White, another African marigold. The blooms are an almost-white creamy yellow with bright yellow centers that give you the best of both worlds.

Orange-Red

Orange-Red

To contrast your creamy yellow marigolds, choose an orange-red type. This captivating color is intense and fiery, often complimented by touches of yellow in the petals or center of the flowers.

The dense pom-poms of Zenith Red, part of the same series as Lemon Yellow, change color slowly over time, switching between a deep red and fiery orange that provide continual interest in the garden.

Red Gem, again related to the Yellow Gem, is a Signet marigold with gorgeous orange-red petals and a bright yellow center. These colorful blooms are bound to catch your eye, making a fantastic statement piece.

Deep Red

Deep Red

For a richer, velvety red, there are a few marigold types to choose from. These flowers add instant elegance to your beds with deep blooms from dark red to almost chocolate-brown. Combine these marigolds with leafy deep green plants for excellent contrast and mood-building.

The French marigold Fireball says it all with its name. Starting out a deep and dark red once opened, the blooms change to a brighter orange and end off a golden color, emulating the colors of the flames it is named after.

Durango Red and Alumia Red are similar French marigolds with an intense red color that holds throughout the season. Plant them next to other French marigolds in orange and yellow across entire beds for an array of bright colors throughout summer.

Red-Yellow Bicolor

Red-Yellow Bicolor

Of all the double-colored petals, red and yellow are the most popular combination when it comes to marigolds. These flowers provide the best of both worlds, with luminous yellow and deep red that contrasts wonderfully.

One of the more common bicolor marigolds is Colossus. This French marigold has deep red petals with yellow edges. These colors, combined with the density of the petals, explain why Colossus is a garden favorite among marigold lovers.

Bounty, another French marigold, adds something a little different. The petals are also edged in a slight ring of yellow, but contrast again with the bright yellow centers that hero both colors.

Orange-Yellow Bicolor

Orange-Yellow Bicolor

Orange and yellow bicolor marigolds are your answer for a more harmonious pairing. Many of the bicolor flowers fall under this color category, giving you many types to choose from.

Safari Scarlet, a French marigold, has orange-red petals with yellow tips that blend perfectly together. They remain compact and flower prolifically – ideal for growing in containers on a balcony or patio.

Wrap Up

Fans of fiery colors will certainly find what they are looking for in the marigold genus. As they grow well together, you don’t need to be limited to one type either. Choose your favorites and dot them around your garden for stunning pops of summer color.

For more, see our essential guide to everything you need to know about how to grow Marigolds.


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