Everything You Need to Know About Monstera Plants and Soil! 

Monstera plants offer something for everyone, with species ranging from the big and holey Monstera delicosa to the silvery and delicate Monstera siltepecana. No matter what type of Monstera you own, you need to set it up for success with the proper soil mix. Although this genus of plants is diverse, they all require similar potting mixes. Join us as we help you choose the best soil mix for your beloved Monstera plants.

Contents: 


The Best Soil Mix for Monstera Plants – The Essentials

Monstera plants do best in potting mix that holds moisture yet also drains well. They prefer a soil mix with a slightly acidic pH, in the range of 5.5-6.5. A soil mix containing 1 part peat moss/coco coir, 1 part perlite, and 4 parts pine bark fines is an excellent mix for Monsteras.


Why Soil Choice Matters

Why Soil Choice Matters

When you choose a soil mix, you want it to provide your plants with five things.

  1. A place to anchor
  2. Proper gas exchange
  3. The right amount of water
  4. Temperature control
  5. Nutrients

If you choose a potting mix that doesn’t suit your plant, your plant will struggle to obtain what it needs. This can result in serious issues and even death.


Signs You’re Using the Wrong Soil Mix for Monstera Plants

Signs You’re Using the Wrong Soil Mix for Monstera Plants

If you’re using the wrong soil mix, your Monstera will let you know. Here are some common signs that something is wrong with the mix you’re using.

Yellow or Yellowing Monstera leaves are a sign that your plant may not be getting enough air or water.

If you are using a mix that doesn’t offer enough drainage, your plant will be sitting in water. In simple terms, it’s drowning!

If you are using a mix that doesn’t hold enough water, your plants may not be able to take in the water they need. This can also cause yellow leaves.

Brown spots are a symptom of root rot caused by overwatering. These spots may appear small and then enlarge and/or spread throughout the plant over time.

Even if you’re only watering once every few weeks, an improper soil mix can prevent soil from drying out. As the roots sit in constant moisture they begin to rot and your plant cannot properly take up water or nutrients.


The Importance of Well-Draining Potting Soil for Monstera Plants

The Importance of Well-Draining Potting Soil for Monstera Plants

One of the easiest ways to harm your Monstera plant is by letting it sit in water. Watering Monstera too frequently can cause this problem, but using a poorly-drained potting soil can also lead to issues.

A well-draining potting soil allows excess water to move through the soil, rather than sit in the soil. If you choose a mix where excess water can escape, your plant’s roots won’t be sitting in moisture, which prevents problems with root rot.

Another reason why it’s crucial that water can drain from soil relates to proper aeration. If all the airspaces in the soil mix are filled with water, the roots cannot access oxygen.

Additionally, beneficial soil microbes will also die if they cannot take up the air they need.


What Soil pH is Best for Monstera Plants?

All types of Monstera plants do best in a soil with a slightly acidic pH. Remember that a neutral pH is 7.0, and any number below this is considered acidic.

Monsteras do best in a mix with a pH between 5.5-6.5.


How Pot Shape and Plant Size Impact Soil Choice

How Pot Shape and Plant Size Impact Soil Choice

The pot shape and plant size don’t affect the soil you choose. All types of Monstera plants in all types of containers will do best in a well-draining soil mix with a slightly acidic pH.

With that said, the container and plant size will impact how much you need to water.

Larger plants in larger pots will require more water than smaller plants in smaller pots. But, that doesn’t mean you should choose a soil mix that holds more water. Rather, apply a larger volume of water each time you give your plant a drink.


The Best Soil for Repotting Monstera Plants

The Best Soil for Repotting Monstera Plants

When it comes time to repot your Monstera, use a potting mix that has the same qualities mentioned above. Always switch out your soil when you repot your plants in order to remove any issue with compaction and diseases.


The Ultimate Monstera Plant Potting Mix Recipe

The Ultimate Monstera Plant Potting Mix Recipe

If you’re looking to make a potting mix for your Monstera plants, you’re in luck. It’s easy to make a great mix at home, as long as you have access to a few materials. No matter what species of Monstera you own, it will love the potting mix outlined below.

 We’re going to cover the basic components of a great potting mix and then provide a recipe.

Components of a Monstera Potting Mix

Sphagnum peat moss has fine particles yet a coarse texture. This leads to great water-holding and nutrient-holding capacities along with good aeration.

Coco coir is made from the husks of coconuts. It has a similar texture to peat moss but compacts a bit more over time.

Pine bark fines are small pieces of coniferous trees such as firs, pines, and spruces. This bark has a high percentage of lignin, which means it retains its shape over time. Therefore, it’s excellent at resisting compaction and providing air pockets.

Perlite is a type of expanded rock. It looks and feels a lot like styrofoam. It does not absorb water, so it is great at providing aeration and drainage to a soil mix.

The Best Monstera Potting Mix Recipe

Now that you understand a bit about what each component provides to a potting mix, here’s a great recipe to follow. It offers great aeration and drainage, yet also holds enough water for your plant to take up all it needs.

This mix is made up of:

  • 4 parts pine bark fines
  • 1 part perlite
  • 1 part sphagnum peat moss OR coco coir

To make the mix, add all the ingredients to a large container then add water until just moist. Thoroughly mix the ingredients together and then fill your Monstera pots.


Storebought Monstera Potting Mix

If you don’t want to make a potting mix at home, you can buy one from the store and add some extra perlite or orchid mix bark to increase drainage.

A standard houseplant potting mix such as the Foxfarm Ocean Forest Potting Mix or Miracle Grow Indoor Potting Mix provides a good base. To make the mix even better, combine 5 parts of the potting mix with 1 part orchid bark and 1 part perlite.

You shouldn’t use cacti or succulent soil mix for Monsteras. However, as noted above, you can mix an orchid soil mix in with a standard potting mix to increase drainage and aeration.

Wrapping Up

Now that you know all about the best soil mix for Monstera plants, you can keep your plants healthy and happy.


Monstera Plant Soil Tips FAQ

Monstera plants do best in soil with a slightly acidic pH. Remember that a neutral pH is 7.0, and any number below this is considered acidic. Monsteras do best in a mix with a pH between 5.5-6.5.

Cacti or succulent soil mixes tend to have similar beneficial characteristics (such as slight acidity and good drainage) which is suitable for Monstera plants.

Always switch out your soil when you repot your Monstera plants in order to remove any issue with compaction and diseases.

To make the Monstera soil mix, add all the ingredients to a large container then add water until just moist. Thoroughly mix the ingredients together and then fill your Monstera pots.

Monstera plants do best in a potting mix that holds moisture yet also drains well. Ensure your potting vessel has a drainage system so excess water can disperse during watering cycles.


For More Monstera Plant Care Essentials:


Author

I’ve long been fascinated with the world of flowers, plants, and floral design. I come from a family of horticulturists and growers and spent much of my childhood in amongst the fields of flowering blooms and greenhouses filled with tropical plants, cacti, and succulents from all over the world. Today, my passion has led me to further explore the world of horticulture, botany, and floristry and I'm always excited to meet and collaborate with fellow enthusiasts and professionals from across the globe.

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