Check out the weigela if you’re looking for a flowering shrub for hedges or a compact bush for container plantings. These deciduous shrubs feature arching stems covered with beautiful leaves and produce trumpet-shaped flowers. Plus, weigela bushes are prized for being low-maintenance, and with variations in foliage color, plant height, and flower color, chances are good you can find a weigela that fits your garden style. In this guide, I’ll run through my favorite types of weigela bushes to grow at home and my essential care tips for optimal growth and plant health. 

Weigela Bushes: Your Complete Growing & Care Guide

About Weigela Bushes

Weigela plants are a group of shrubs in the honeysuckle family, Caprifoliaceae. They can range in height from 3–15 feet tall and are native to East Asia.

All weigela species have oblong, deciduous leaves that narrow to a pointed tip. When spring or early summer arrives, the plants produce clusters of trumpet-shaped flowers that can be red, pink, white, or yellow.

Gardeners know these bushes for being low-maintenance and drought-tolerant. This relatively carefree nature—and a beautiful appearance— makes Weigela popular for hedges, mixed gardens, and even container plantings.

As long as you live in a suitable growing zone, you can expect your weigela plants to return year after year.

Planting & Growing Weigela Bushes

Weigela Bushes in blooms showcasing pink blossoms

Weigela bushes are pretty easy to care for, but it’s still helpful to learn about their ideal environment.

Best Times of Year to Plant

The fall is the best time to plant weigela shrubs. You want to find the spot after the summer heat has passed but before frost arrives. Planting during this time will allow the plant to comfortably settle into its new home before winter arrives.

Late September or October is the best time to plant weigela in many locations. However, if you live in a cold climate, you may be able to plant in early September. The goal is to get your plants in the ground about a month or two before the first fall frost.

You can also plant weigela plants in the spring. Just make sure you wait until the danger of frost is gone.

Suitable Locations to Plant

You can plant weigela bushes directly in the ground or in containers. If you want to plant one of these shrubs in a pot, choose smaller varieties that will be happy in a limited space.

As far as garden location goes, look for a well-draining area that receives lots of sun. And since some weigela can grow quite tall, ensure there’s enough room for them to expand without encroaching on other plants.

Considerations for Pots & Container Gardens

You can also grow weigela plants in pots. All weigela grow at least a couple of feet tall, so make sure you choose a larger pot that is at least a foot in diameter. And don’t forget to look for drainage holes!

Fill your pot with well-draining potting soil and place it in a sunny location.

Smaller weigela varieties typically grow better in containers, so keep an eye out for dwarf varieties.

Soil Requirements

These shrubs like soil that is a bit acidic, so make sure the pH is between 5.5 and 7.0. If your soil is more alkaline, you can add agricultural sulfur to lower the pH. However, it will take multiple months before you notice a difference in pH.

Weigela isn’t too picky about the soil composition but prefers well-draining soil. Loosening compacted soil with a shovel or digging fork before planting will help keep these plants happy.

Light Considerations

Weigela bushes prefer at least six hours of direct sun each day. They may be able to handle a bit less light but don’t be surprised if you notice fewer flowers, slowed growth, or faded foliage.

Essential Weigela Plant Care

Pink Weigela Bushes in bloom

Once you’ve selected weigela and planted it at home, follow these care tips.

Watering

Weigela are drought-tolerant and don’t need a whole lot of water once they’re established. However, you’ll want to keep the soil moderately moist the first few months the plants are in the ground.

You’ll only have to water established plants about once every week or two in the summer. Watering deeply and infrequently will help the plants develop strong and expansive root systems.

Container-grown plants will dry out quicker than in-ground plants, so expect to water these guys at least once a week.

Fertilizing

These plants don’t require much fertilizer to thrive, but they can benefit from a dose of a balanced fertilizer (I like this one via Amazon) in the middle of spring. Both liquid and granular options will work well.

Pruning

You don’t need to prune weigela plants—they’re genuinely low-maintenance. However, they’ll always appreciate it if you remove any dead or damaged wood in the winter.

Since weigela plants flower on old wood, you’ll want to prune the plants after flowering. That means you can shape your plants in the summer or fall.

Pest Control & Deer Resistance

Deer and rabbits typically leave weigela alone, so you don’t have to worry about protecting these plants from large critters. However, they are susceptible to some common plant pests.

Watch for tiny sap-sucking creatures like spider mites, aphids, and thrips. These pests can quickly multiply and lead to damaged or discolored leaves.

You can wipe off small numbers of these pests with a soapy rag and spray larger populations with neem oil or insecticidal soap. Make sure to thoroughly coat the pests since these products work on contact.

End of Season and Overwinter Care

Weigela plants don’t require any special winter care. Optional steps include removing any dead branches and mulching around the plants with wood chips.

As long as you live in USDA hardiness zone four and above, these plants will likely survive the winter outdoors.


Here, I’ve included a selection of my absolute favorite weigela bushes to grow at home. There’s a mix of foliage colors and height variances, each offering various planting options. 

1. Bristol Snowflake Weigela

Bristol Snowflake are popular types of Weigela Bushes

The ‘Bristol Snowflake’ weigela bushes produce gracefully arching branches and delicate white flowers that resemble falling snow. Its leaves are deep green and keep their color well into the fall.

The medium size means it works well in mixed garden plantings and hedges, but it’s a bit big for most containers.

Scientific Name:Weigela ‘Bristol Snowflake’
Growing Zones:4–8
Colors:white flowers and green leaves
Flowering Season:late spring and early summer
Light:Full sun
Soil:well-drained and slightly acidic
Height/Spread:four feet tall and four feet wide
Maintenance:low

2. Czechmark Trilogy Weigela

Czechmark Trilogy are popular types of Weigela Bushes

This hybrid weigela displays three different colors of flowers on the same plant! Medium shrubs burst to life with white, pink, and blooms in the spring and again in the late summer.

When the plant isn’t flowering, it displays rich green leaves. Like most types of weigela, this variety can tolerate drought as well as pressure from deer and rabbits.

Scientific Name:Weigela florida ‘VUKOZGemini’
Growing Zones:4–8
Colors:white, red, and pink flowers; green leaves
Flowering Season:Spring and late summer/early fall
Light:Full sun
Soil:well-drained
Height/Spread:four feet tall and four feet wide
Maintenance:low

3. Fine Wine Weigela 

Fine Wine Weigela

Fine Wine weigela bushes are a compact plant with arching branches and deep pink flowers. Along with its pink flowers, the plant delights with deep maroon leaves that inspire the name Fine Wine.

Since it’s on the smaller side, it can work well in container gardens. Just make sure to choose a pot that is at least a foot wide and deep, and fill it with well-draining potting soil.

Scientific Name:Weigela florida ‘Bramwell’
Growing Zones:4–8
Colors:pink flowers and maroon leaves
Flowering Season:spring
Light:Full sun
Soil:well-drained
Height/Spread:Three feet tall and three feet wide
Maintenance:low

4. French Lace Weigela

French Lace Weigela

The French Lace weigela bushes first appeared as a genetic mutation on a ‘Bristol Ruby’ plant. Plant breeders noticed the differing appearance, isolated it, and further developed it.

Today, this weigela has vibrant red flowers with dark pink interiors. Its leaves are also gorgeous, with light green interiors and yellow edges. 

While these plants thrive in full sun, you can grow them in the understory of larger trees or in partial shade. However, expect fewer flowers and drabber foliage.

Scientific Name:Weigela florida ‘Brigela’
Growing Zones:4–8
Colors:red flowers and green leaves
Flowering Season:Spring and early summer
Light:full sun
Soil:well-draining
Height/Spread:up to eight feet tall and eight feet wide
Maintenance:low

5. Golden Jackpot Weigela

Golden Jackpot Weigela

The Golden Jackpot weigela stands out with bright yellow leaves that keep their color from spring through fall. The medium-sized shrubs produce dark pink, trumpet-shaped flowers in the spring, adding even more beauty to the landscape.

Since these plants grow from four to six feet tall, they can make great hedges or stand-alone plants. You can also try mixing them with green-leaved weiglea for a nice contrast.

Scientific Name: Weigela florida ‘MonRigney’

Scientific Name:Weigela florida ‘MonRigney’
Growing Zones:4–8
Colors:dark pink flowers, yellow foliage
Flowering Season:spring
Light:full sun
Soil:well-drained, can tolerate clay
Height/Spread:six feet tall and six feet wide
Maintenance:low

6. Midnight Wine Weigela

Midnight Wine Weigela

The Midnight Wine weigela bushes add a rich and elegant feel to your garden with deep purple foliage. It produces nodding dark pink flowers in the spring.

The variety only grows a couple of feet tall and wide, which makes it a great option for container plantings or mixed garden beds. Try mixing it with summer flowering perennials to create a garden that’s filled with color from spring through fall.

Scientific Name:Weigela florida ‘Elvera’
Growing Zones:4–8
Colors:deep purple foliage and pink flowers
Flowering Season:spring
Light:full sun
Soil:well-drained
Height/Spread:18 inches and 30 inches wide
Maintenance:low

7. Minuet Weigela

Minuet Weigela

The Minuet weigela is a dwarf variety with green foliage tinged with purple. It produces a major flush of pink and red flowers in May and June, but a few other flowers may appear later in the season.

This weigela remains on the smaller side, so it’s a good option for container plantings. You can also grow it in mixed perennial gardens or linear plantings along paths and driveways.

Scientific Name:Weigela florida ‘Minuet’
Growing Zones:4–8
Colors:pink and red flowers
Flowering Season:Spring and early summer
Light:full sun
Soil:well-drained
Height/Spread:three feet tall and four feet wide
Maintenance:low

8. Red Prince Weigela

Red Prince Weigela

Red Prince is a large weigela bush that produces loads of dark pink flowers in May and June. It also displays bright green foliage with hints of purple and red.

Since this weigela gets quite large, it can work great as a privacy hedge or other type of border. You can let the plants grow wild or prune them after flowering to maintain a neater shape.

Scientific Name:Weigela florida ‘Red Prince’
Growing Zones:4–8
Colors:dark pink flowers
Flowering Season:Spring and early summer
Light:full sun
Soil:well-drained
Height/Spread:up to nine feet tall and nine feet wide
Maintenance:low

9. Ruby Queen Weigela (Weigela ‘Ruby Queen’)

Ruby Queen Weigela (Weigela 'Ruby Queen')

These dwarf weigela bushes sport dark purple foliage with hints of link green. The leaves keep their vibrant color from spring to fall, and the plants produce pink flowers in the spring.

You can utilize the plant’s compact form in container plantings on porches and decks, or tuck the small shrub into mixed plantings.

Scientific Name:Weigela ‘Ruby Queen’
Growing Zones:4–8
Colors:dark purple foliage and pink flowers
Flowering Season:Spring and early summer
Light:full sun
Soil:well-drained
Height/Spread:Three feet tall and three feet wide
Maintenance:low

10. Sonic Bloom® Pink Weigela 

Sonic Bloom® Pink Weigela

While most types of weigela bushes produce the bulk of their flowers in the spring and early summer, the Sonic Boom® Pink blooms throughout the summer. You can expect to see the first pink flowers in the late spring and then watch more blooms form up until the first frost.

The plant’s medium size makes it a good choice for small hedges, front-of-house plantings, or mixed garden beds.

Scientific Name:Weigela florida ‘Bokrasopin’
Growing Zones:4–8
Colors:pink flowers
Flowering Season:late spring and early summer
Light:full sun
Soil:well-drained
Height/Spread:five feet tall and five feet wide
Maintenance:low

11. Sonic Bloom® Red Weigela

Sonic Bloom® Red Weigela

Like its pink cousin, the red Sonic Bloom® is a repeat bloomer. The medium shrubs begin producing red flowers in the late spring and continue blooming through the fall.

You don’t have to worry about deadheading the shrubs—the plants will continue producing flowers even if you neglect them. These plants can also tolerate various soil conditions but will flower best in full sun.

Scientific Name:Weigela florida ‘Sonic Bloom Red’
Growing Zones:4–8
Colors:red flowers
Flowering Season:Spring and early summer
Light:full sun
Soil:well-drained
Height/Spread:five feet tall and five feet wide
Maintenance:low

12. Spilled Wine Weigela

Spilled Wine are popular types of Weigela bushes

While spilled wine may be cause for concern, this colorful weigela will bring cheerfulness to your garden. It features dark purple leaves and bright pink flowers.

Its compact form means it thrives in containers as well as with other shorter plants. Since it likes full sun, make sure taller plants don’t shade out this dwarf weigela. 

Scientific Name:Weigela florida ‘Bokraspiwi’
Growing Zones:4–8
Colors:dark purple foliage and pink flowers
Flowering Season:Spring and early summer
Light:full sun
Soil:well-drained
Height/Spread:Three feet tall and three feet wide
Maintenance:low

13. Tango Weigela

Tango Weigela

If you’re looking for a compact weigela bush for deck planters or porch garden boxes, check out Tango. This dwarf variety has vibrant green flowers and produces bright pink flowers that attract bees and hummingbirds.

It remains under three feet tall and is a good choice for small spaces. Just make sure you provide it with at least six hours of sun each day.

Scientific Name:Weigela ‘Tango’
Growing Zones:4–8
Colors:pink flowers
Flowering Season:Spring and early summer
Light:full sun
Soil:well-drained
Height/Spread:two-and-a-half feet tall and three feet wide
Maintenance:low

14. Variegated Weigela

Variegated Weigela

You’ve seen weigela bushes with dark green and even purple leaves, but what about variegated foliage? As its name alludes, this weigela has two-toned leaves that feature bright green and white.

The plant’s pink flowers are also quite lively thanks to varying shades of pink. Since these plants grow to a medium size, they work well as hedges or stand-alone plants.

Scientific Name:Weigela florida ‘Variegata’
Growing Zones:3–8
Colors:green and white foliage, pink flowers
Flowering Season:Spring and early summer
Light:Full sun
Soil:well-drained
Height/Spread:six feet tall and six feet wide
Maintenance:low

15. Wine and Roses Weigela

Wine and Roses Weigela

The Wine and Roses weigela produces bright pink flowers in the spring and early summer. However, the plant’s deep purple foliage adds interest to the garden from spring through fall.

The plants prefer full sun and will keep their rich foliage color despite bright light. Try tucking a few of these plants in the front or side of your home, or plant them together to create a hedge.

Scientific Name:Weigela florida ‘Alexandra’
Growing Zones:4–8
Colors:pink flowers and deep purple foliage
Flowering Season:Spring and early summer
Light:full sun
Soil:well-drained
Height/Spread:five feet tall and five feet wide
Maintenance:low

Weigela Bushes – Wrapping Up

Weigela bushes are easy-to-care-for plants that can survive drought, poor soil, and even a bit of neglect. Plant them in an area with lots of sun and enjoy their colorful foliage and trumpet-shaped blooms.


Contributing Editor | Full Bio | + posts

Briana holds a B.S. in Plant Sciences from Penn State University. She manages a small market garden where she grows vegetables and herbs. She also enjoys growing flowers and houseplants at home.

Author Briana Yablonski

Briana holds a B.S. in Plant Sciences from Penn State University. She manages a small market garden where she grows vegetables and herbs. She also enjoys growing flowers and houseplants at home.

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