The Best Spider Plant Varieties to Grow at Home

Chlorophytum comosum, or the Spider Plant, is adored by beginner and expert plant enthusiasts alike. Its easygoing nature, lively appearance, and beneficial properties make it an excellent indoor plant for a host of living spaces. In this guide, we’re going to take you through 10 of the most popular types of spider plants to grow at home. Plus, we’ll walk you through everything you need to know about how to grow and care for spider plants.  


About Spider Plants 

About Spider Plants

Scientific Facts about Spider Plants

The species name for the Spider Plant is Chlorophytum comosum. This species belongs to the plant family Asparagaceae and the genus Chlorophytum. However, it commonly goes by Spider Plant, Ribbon Plant, Spider Ivy, and Hen and Chickens. 

Botanical Characteristics 

Now, the Spider Plant is an evergreen perennial flowering plant. Its narrow leaves are often bright green or variegated with cream-colored vertical stripes. 

The plant’s leaves grow out in all directions, creating a wild and unique appearance.  Leaves can produce white flowers and small baby plants that are great contenders for propagation

Primary Types of Spider Plants 

The most well-known types of Spider Plants are variegated with cream-colored stripes. Solid green spider plants exist, though they are slightly less common. You can also find curly spider plants with leaves that grow in a unique, swirling pattern. 

Where Are Spider Plants Native?

Chlorophytum comosum plants are native to tropical and southern parts of Africa. Since they were discovered, plant experts have naturalized them in other parts of the world like Western Australia. 

Are Spider Plants Easy to Care for?

Yes, Spider Plants are very easy and beginner-friendly. They are tolerant and relatively low-maintenance regarding sunlight, soil, watering, fertilizing, and other factors. 

The main challenge with this species is avoiding overwatering. Giving this plant more than its required amount of water can cause water stress or root rot. 

Spider Plants – Uses and Benefits 

Interestingly, Spider Plants help purify the air in their environment. NASA’s Clean Air Study showed that they could remove toxins like formaldehyde, xylene, and toluene from the air. 

Some Feng shui practitioners say the Spider Plant can bring good luck and improve your focus. Others claim the species can lower stress. These qualities make this plant great for an office space. 


Here you’ll find 10 of my absolute favorite types of spider plants to grow indoors at home or in the office. 

1) Bonnie Curly Spider Plant (Chlorophytum comosum ‘Bonnie’)

Bonnie Curly Spider Plant (Chlorophytum comosum ‘Bonnie’)

The Bonnie is a curly spider plant variety with long, narrow leaves that grow in a waved pattern. This plant is native to southern Africa, but it is a common alternative to the popular variegated Spider Plant worldwide. 

This Bonnie plant has solid green, slightly wider leaves than other varieties. Like other Spider Plants, this one may be harder to get your hands on than the variegated options. 

General care requirements:Easy and low-maintenance
Growth expectations:Can reach around eight inches tall and wide.
Environmental considerations:Grow best in bright, indirect light. Well-draining, slightly moist soil. Moderate to high humidity. Temperatures between 70 and 90 degrees Fahrenheit.

2) Variegated Bonnie Spider Plant (Chlorophytum comosum ‘Bonnie Variegated’)

Variegated Bonnie Spider Plant (Chlorophytum comosum ‘Bonnie Variegated’)

The Variegated Bonnie Spider Plant is a curly variety with variegated leaves. Its leaves are long and thin, with green stripes on the outside and a cream stripe in the center. 

This species is native to South Africa, but it is popular worldwide. Its curly texture makes it a striking focal point in indoor spaces. 

General care requirements:Easy and low-maintenance
Growth expectations:Can grow to be around eight inches tall with an eight-inch spread.
Environmental considerations:Bright, indirect light. Well-draining, slightly moist soil. Moderate to high humidity. Temperatures between 70 and 90 degrees Fahrenheit.

3) Zebra Grass (Chlorophytum laxum ‘Zebra’)

Zebra Grass (Chlorophytum laxum ‘Zebra’)

The Zebra Grass plant has long yellow-cream leaves with a green stripe down the center. This plant’s foliage has a similar texture to grass and is likely to stay shorter than other Spider Plant varieties. 

Zebra Grass is native to tropical parts of Africa. It produces plenty of baby plants from the ends of its stems, making it a great contender for propagation.

General care requirements:Easy and low-maintenance
Growth expectations:Can reach eight to 12 inches in height and around an 18 to 24-inch spread upon maturity.
Environmental considerations:Bright, indirect light. Well-draining, peat-based soil. Moderate to high humidity. Temperatures between 65 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit

4) Variegated Spider Plant (Chlorophytum comosum ‘Vittatum’)

Variegated Spider Plant (Chlorophytum comosum ‘Vittatum’)

The Variegated Spider Plant ‘Vittatum’ is known for its green leaves with a solid cream stripe down the center. These narrow leaves arch outward from a rosette at its center, creating the classic Spider Plant look.

This plant is native to South Africa and grows well outdoors in Mediterranean climates or indoors around the world. It has earned the Royal Horticultural Society’s Award of Garden Merit. 

General care requirements:Easy and low-maintenance
Growth expectations:Can grow to be one to two feet tall and wide.
Environmental considerations:Bright, indirect light. Well-draining, slightly moist soil. Moderate to high humidity. Temperatures between 55 and 70 degrees Fahrenheit

5) Variegated Spider Plant (Chlorophytum comosum ‘Variegatum’)

Variegated Spider Plant (Chlorophytum comosum ‘Variegatum’)

The Variegated Spider Plant ‘Variegatum’ is similar to the Chlorophytum comosum ‘Vittatum’ variety. The only difference is that the leaves are reversed. 

While ‘Vittatum’ has a cream stripe down the center, ‘Variegatum’ has cream edges and a green center. This plant is native to southern Africa and cultivated as a houseplant around the world. 

General care requirements:Easy and low-maintenance
Growth expectations:Can reach two feet in height and spread.
Environmental considerations:Bright, indirect light, or partially shaded environment. Well-draining, slightly moist, loam-based soil. Moderate to high humidity. Temperatures between 70 and 90 degrees Fahrenheit.

6) Ocean Spider Plant (Chlorophytum comosum ‘Ocean’)

Ocean Spider Plant (Chlorophytum comosum ‘Ocean’)

The Ocean Spider Plant is a compact variety with green leaves and thin, cream-white edges. It produces star-shaped white flowers and baby plants from long runners that cascade around the plant. This plant looks lovely in a hanging basket where its leaves are free to grow and spread around its pot. 

General care requirements:Easy and low-maintenance
Growth expectations:Can grow to be around eight inches tall and wide.
Environmental considerations:Bright, indirect light. Well-draining, slightly moist soil (keep drier in the winter). Moderate to high humidity. Ambient temperatures around 60 degrees Fahrenheit

7) Hawaiian Spider Plant (Chlorophytum viridescens ‘Hawaiian’)

Hawaiian Spider Plant (Chlorophytum viridescens ‘Hawaiian’)

The Hawaiian Spider Plant is also known as Golden Glow or Golden Light. This plant is similar to the Chlorophytum comosum ‘Vittatum.’ However, instead of a cream center, this plant’s leaves have a yellow hue down the middle. 

This plant is a hybrid that is smaller than some Chlorophytum comosum varieties. It produces many plantlets, making it a great choice if you want several Spider Plants to decorate your home. 

General care requirements:Easy and low-maintenance
Growth expectations:Can reach anywhere between six to 12 inches tall.
Environmental considerations:Bright, indirect light. Well-draining, slightly moist soil. Moderate to high humidity. Temperatures between 70 and 90 degrees Fahrenheit. It can handle lower temperatures, but this may affect its growth.

8) Chlorophytum amaniense ‘Fire Flash’ (aka Chlorophytum orchidastrum Green Orange)

Chlorophytum amaniense 'Fire Flash’ (aka Chlorophytum orchidastrum Green Orange)

The Fire Flash Spider Plant is also known as Chlorophytum orchidastrum Green Orange. This plant is a rare variety that looks different than other Spider Plants. It has bright orange stems that produce broad, dark green leaves. 

This variety is native to tropical and subtropical parts of southern and western Africa. It produces small, white flowers in the summer and lively foliage year-round.

General care requirements:Easy and low-maintenance
Growth expectations:Can grow to be one to two feet tall and wide.
Environmental considerations:Bright, indirect light. Well-draining, slightly moist soil. High humidity. Temperatures between 70 and 90 degrees Fahrenheit

9) Spider Flower (Cleome hassleriana)

Spider Flower (Cleome hassleriana)

The Spider Flower may be associated with the Spider Plant given its name. However, this annual flowering plant belongs to the caper family Capparaceae and is native to South America. 

The Spider Flower is beautiful in outdoor gardens, as it develops strong stems and showy blooms in bright pink, white, or purple. This plant attracts pollinators from birds and bees to hummingbirds and bats. 

General care requirements:Easy and beginner-friendly
Growth expectations:Can reach one to five feet tall and six to eight inches in spread.
Environmental considerations:Bright, direct light. Well-draining soil. Moderate to high humidity. Temperatures between 75 and 85 degrees Fahrenheit.

10) Bichetii Grass (Chlorophytum laxum)

Bichetii Grass (Chlorophytum laxum)

The Bichetii Grass plant looks similar to the Chlorophytum comosum ‘Variegatum’. It has green, arching leaves and cream margins around the outside. The plant’s foliage has a soft, grass-like texture and produces white flowers like some Spider Plant varieties. 

A difference with Bichetii Grass is that it does not produce baby plants as most Spider Plants do. This species is the perfect choice if you want the Spider Plant look without the offshoots.  

General care requirements:Easy and low-maintenance
Growth expectations:Can reach one foot tall with a two-foot spread.
Environmental considerations:Lighting from full sun to partial shade. Well-draining soil with moderate watering. Moderate to high humidity. Temperatures between 60 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit.

How to Grow Spider Plants Indoors 

How to Grow Spider Plants Indoors

What to Do Before Planting 

Before planting your Spider Plant, you will want to find an indoor spot with bright, indirect light and moderate to high humidity. This plant loves a spot in the bathroom. However, it will do well on a surface or desk in any room as long as you meet its care needs.  

You will also want to collect tools like a plastic potting vessel or hanging planter for your Spider Plant to grow. Find a complete list of the materials you will want to have around in the Essential Tools section below. 

What’s the Best Soil Mix for Spider Plants?

Spider Plants thrive in a well-draining organic potting mix. This species does best in soil with a neutral pH level between 6.0 and 7.2. The best soil recipes for Spider Plants will have ingredients like perlite or pumice to improve drainage. 

How to Plant Spider Plants

How to Plant Spider Plants

Now, here are the steps you will want to take when planting or repotting your new Spider Plant

  • Remove your Spider Plant from its current container and massage the root ball to remove old soil.
  • Prepare a well-draining potting mix for the plant.To improve drainage, you may want to add pumice or perlite to the soil. 
  • Grab a plastic container one size larger than the plant’s current pot. Make sure this planter has a drainage hole at the base. 
  • Add a layer of your potting mix to the bottom of the container so that the top o the plant’s root ball will be at the same level as it was in its previous pot. 
  • Place the plant in the planter and fill the space around it with soil so that it’s sturdy in its new environment. 
  • Water thoroughly and place in a spot with plenty of bright, indirect sunlight. 

Light Preferences 

Spider Plants prefer to grow in a spot with bright, indirect sunlight. They enjoy sheltered environments away from contact with the sun’s rays, as their leaves can burn in direct light. All aspects will work well for your Spider Plant as long as you meet its lighting requirements. 

Temperature and Humidity Preferences 

Now, most Spider Plants will enjoy moderate to high humidity and temperatures from around 70 and 90 degrees Fahrenheit. Generally, if you feel comfortable in your home, your Spider Plant will, too. However, if the plant craves more humidity, it may appreciate regular misting. 


How to Care for Spider Plants 

How to Care for Spider Plants

General Watering Considerations

Remember, Spider Plants enjoy slightly moist soil, but they may develop issues with overwatering. The key is to make sure you only water the plant when the top portion of its soil is dry. 

Hydrate the plant enough for water to exit the drainage hole. Ensure to dump out any excess water sitting in the plant’s saucer. Additionally, this plant will prefer water free of chemicals, so filtered water and rainwater work well. 

General Light Considerations

When it comes to Spider Plant light requirements, the most important thing is to avoid direct contact with the sun. Remember, this plant loves bright, indirect light, but the direct sun can burn its foliage. 

General Fertilization Preferences

Your Ribbon Plant will benefit from fertilization. However, overfertilization can lead to a brown, crispy appearance on its foliage. You can apply an all-purpose fertilizer for houseplants once or twice a month during the spring and summer. Avoid fertilization in the winter. 

When and How to Prune Spider Plants

Your Spider Plant will do well with pruning in the spring and summer months. Use sharp scissors to trim the foliage you want to remove at the plant’s base. You can use this approach to prune dead or diseased parts of the plant as well as pups that you’d like to propagate. 

Propagation 

Propagation

Propagating Spider Plants is an easy and fun process. Here are the steps to take to turn your plant’s pups into new baby Spider Plants. 

  • Find a baby plantlet that has begun to develop roots. 
  • Use scissors to trim above the plantlet’s foliage to disconnect it from the parent plant.
  • Place this new plant in a small container with the same potting soil you use for the original plant. You can add several plantlets to the same pot to achieve a fuller look. 
  • Water thoroughly and keep the soil moist until the plant’s roots are established in its new environment. 
  • Once the plant is established, switch to the same watering schedule you use for the original plant, watering only when the top few inches of soil are dry.

When and How to Repot 

You may want to consider repotting your Spider Plant every year or two, depending on how fast it grows. You’ll know it is time to repot if the plant becomes root bound or roots are growing out of the drainage hole. 

If you’re repotting the whole plant, you will want to go up one pot size from its current container. You can also divide your Spider Plant into smaller plants. If you choose this method, place them in smaller containers appropriate for their new size. 


Common Problems, Pests, and Diseases 

Common Problems, Pests, and Diseases

Generally, Spider Plants don’t suffer from too many pest or disease-related issues. However, here are a few you may encounter when growing this species in your home. 

  • Root rot: You’ll need to remove the plant from its soil and trim away the affected area if you notice root rot. Repot your Spider Plant in a well-draining soil mix and only water when the top layer of soil is dry. 
  • Whiteflies: If you notice whiteflies or a similar infestation, you can create a soapy water solution to spray on your plant. Apply the solution as needed until the issue subsides. 

Essential Tools to Have for Spider Plants

Here is our list of tools to have on hand for optimal Spider Plant care. 

  • Plastic pot with a drainage hole
  • Saucer to place beneath the pot
  • Well-draining potting mix
  • Perlite or pumice for added drainage if needed
  • Watering can with filtered or rainwater
  • Sharp scissors for pruning and propagation
  • Spray bottle for misting if needed

Growing Spider Plants FAQs: 

Do Spider Plants need a lot of sun?

Yes, Spider Plants prefer plenty of bright, indirect light in their growing environment. However, this species will tolerate low light if necessary. Remember, direct sunlight will burn a Spider Plant, so they grow best with protection from direct sun.

Where is the best place to put a Spider Plant?

The best place for a Spider is any spot that receives bright, indirect sunlight throughout the day. The species looks great on desks or tables and in hanging baskets. Spider Plants enjoy humidity, so bathrooms with a bright, indirect light source work well.

Are Spider Plants toxic to humans and pets?

No, Spider Plants are not considered toxic to humans or pets. Still, it is wise to place your Ribbon Plant out of reach of cats and dogs. Pets often enjoy the taste of Spider Plants and may eat enough to get an upset stomach.

How long do Spider Plants live for? 

Interestingly, Spider Plants can live for decades with the proper care. Some Spider Plants may even live longer than their owners and get passed down through families.

How fast do Spider Plants grow?

Spider plants can grow several inches per year. They may take anywhere from five to 10 years to reach their mature size. Many varieties will continue to produce offshoots as they grow and after they’ve matured.


Wrapping Up 

The Spider Plant is an all-time favorite among plant lovers. Since there are so many popular options, they’re an excellent way to add variety to your houseplant collection. Plus, once you’ve learned the Spider Plant’s care needs, it will be easy to keep any type of this species thriving in your home.


Author

Brandy Wells is an American copywriter and content writer living in Spain. From hiking in her hometown near the Smoky Mountains to digging in the dirt in rural Oregon, she has always put a love of nature at the heart of her endeavors. These days, you’ll catch her writing content, and of course, taking breaks to tend to her growing houseplant collection.

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