Monstera plants are popular houseplants thanks to their beautiful fenestrated leaves. As tropical plants, Monsteras require a warm, humid environment indoors. Unfortunately, drafts from air vents can affect these conditions. In this article, we’ll discover whether you can grow Monstera plants near air conditioning units or vents.


What Conditions Do Monstera Plants Need?

What Conditions Do Monstera Plants Need

Monstera plants are evergreen vines that are native to Central and South America. Monsteras inhabit ecosystems with tropical climates, such as jungles and rainforests. These ecosystems experience average temperatures between 70 and 85ºF (21 to 30ºC) and humidity levels between 75 and 90%.

However, some types of Monstera plants can survive in colder regions, such as cloud forests. These habitats have lower humidity levels, between 40 and 50%. Monstera species from these areas can tolerate temperatures down to 55ºF (13º).

While it’s difficult to replicate these environments indoors fully, you should provide warm, humid conditions for your Monstera. Maintain ambient temperatures between 68 and 86ºF (20 to 30ºC) and humidity levels between 60 and 80%.

Average household humidity won’t be high enough for most Monstera species. You can increase ambient humidity by misting regularly and using humidifiers or pebble trays. You could also position your Monstera plant in a humid, steamy bathroom to provide tropical conditions.

Can Monstera Plants Grow Near Air Conditioning Units or Vents?

Can Monstera Plants Grow Near Air Conditioning Units or Vents?

Monstera plants will struggle if positioned near air conditioning units, air vents, or open windows. These areas produce cold drafts that can lower the temperature and humidity around your Monstera. Cold drafts can even cause sudden temperature shock, which could kill your plant.

Protect your Monstera plants from cold drafts at all times. These plants require tropical conditions with warm temperatures and high humidity levels. Cold drafts will compromise the warm, humid environment that your Monstera needs.

Take extra precautions to protect Monsteras from cold drafts during the winter. Although many Monstera species can handle temperatures as low as 55ºF for short periods, they cannot tolerate temperatures below 50ºF (10ºC).

If the humidity around your Monstera is affected by cold drafts from AC units or vents, your plant will use more water. Monsteras usually need watering whenever the top 2 inches of soil feel dry. If the surrounding humidity is too low, you’ll have to water more frequently.

If your Monstera is suffering from cold temperatures or low humidity, it’ll display some warning signs. These can include drooping leaves, limited fenestration, or yellowing foliage with brown edges. Low humidity levels can also create brown spots on the leaves of your Monstera plant.

During the winter, move your Monstera into a warm room and keep it several feet away from any air vents. However, don’t expose your Monstera to dry, hot drafts caused by heaters or radiators. These can also lower the humidity around your plant.

Wrapping Up

Monstera plants should not be near air conditioning units, vents, or windows. These areas produce cold drafts that lower the temperature and humidity around your Monstera plant.

For more, see our in-depth guide to the uses and benefits of Monstera plants.


Editorial Director | Full Bio | + posts

Andrew is the Editorial Director at Petal Republic. He holds a BSc degree in Plant Sciences and has trained professionally at leading floristry schools in London and Paris. In amongst overseeing a global editorial team, Andrew's a passionate content creator around all things flowers, floral design, gardening, and houseplants.

Author

Andrew is the Editorial Director at Petal Republic. He holds a BSc degree in Plant Sciences and has trained professionally at leading floristry schools in London and Paris. In amongst overseeing a global editorial team, Andrew's a passionate content creator around all things flowers, floral design, gardening, and houseplants.

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